Upgrade or not? Windows 10

Upgrade or not? Windows 10.

September 2015 | Alistair Carr

ONLY WINDOWS 7 and Windows 8.1 users will notice a new icon of 4 white squares in their system tray at bottom right of screen – a Microsoft’s advisory of upgrading to its Windows 10 operating system for free.

Clicking it downloads the OS for installation, after having backed up personal and important data, including Favourites and email folders, to an external hard drive via copy and paste, Windows 7 backup and restore, Win 8.1 File History or third party backup programmes.

Minimum PC or notebook requirements for Windows 10 are:
Processor: 1 GHz minimum or SoC
RAM: 1 GB for 32-bit, 2 GB for 64-bit
Hard disk: 16 GB for 32-bit OS, 20 GB for 64-bit OS
Graphics card: DirectX 9 or later with WDDM 1.0 driver
Display: 1024×600.

A satisfactory performance requires 4 GB RAM for 32-bit Windows and 4 GB or 8 GB RAM for 64-bit, and a 2 GHz dual core CPU minimum.

Upgrading gives you a fairly snappy OS, even on older notebooks. Its start menu beats the aggravating Windows 8/8.1’s; popping up like Windows 7’s while still using Windows 8’s style tiles and option to make it full screen.

Though Windows 10 has no Windows Media Centre and Windows media player, Microsoft provides free DVD video playback for upgraders.

After this OS upgrade, Microsoft accounts like OneDrive, Microsoft Office 2013, Xbox or Outlook.com sign-ins are needed to get the most out of it.

OneDrive offers cloud storage for online backups and data sync across devices, Xbox Music and Microsoft’s App store.

Being data synced allows signing in to any Windows 10 device for accessing all your personal files etc. This sync uses too much data on severely limited plans, like 3g/4g mobile Internet ones.

Hence, those happy with Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 can opt not to upgrade.