Meander Valley Gazette

Your Independent Community Newspaper

Burning down the house!

NewsJoanne Eisemann
Smouldering ash ignited a blaze between two houses in Beefeater Street on Friday 14 but Deloraine Fire Brigade was quick to respond.  Photo Mike Moores

Smouldering ash ignited a blaze between two houses in Beefeater Street on Friday 14 but Deloraine Fire Brigade was quick to respond.

Photo Mike Moores

LUCKILY IT was Friday the 14th and not the 13th when Bruce McNicol and Lisa Bartholomew received the news that their woodshed caught fire while they were away down south.

Vigilant neighbours and a quick response from the Deloraine Fire Brigade meant that the fire was quickly under control with no one hurt and only some damage to two properties in Beefeater Street.

The next morning, after a brief flare up, investigation into the cause of the fire found that ash from a fire had reignited, despite being left outside in the cold and damp.

Bruce explained that despite always carefully disposing of ash, in this instance the ash had been mistakenly put on top of older, damp boxes of ash.

The ash had started to smoulder, the boxes caught fire and spread to kindling and other flammable material in the wood shed, then to the fence and the next door property.

Deloraine Fire Brigade had responded immediately, thanks to numerous call-ins by neighbours.

Daniel Watson from the brigade noted that the fire truck was already being prepped for a joint training night and the fire was only a short distance away.

Bruce and his partner Lisa Bartholomew were lucky to only lose a woodshed and part of the adjoining fence, although the fire did burn most of the ivy off the brick walls of their house.

The property next door suffered damage to the back corner of the main weatherboard building, with damage and charring extending up to the rafters on their lean-to.

Bruce and Daniel both stressed that careful disposal of ash from fire places, stoves, fire pits or bonfires is of paramount importance on any property.

Even in the middle of a cold and wet winter, ash will retain its heat and can re-ignite if it is in contact with other combustible material.

Ashes can smoulder for days, so should be stored well away from any flammable material. Placing a metal container with a lid and pouring on water will help to douse any embers.

Cold moist ash can be added to your compost or placed in the garbage if necessary, but be very careful – wheelie bins catch fire!

And if you are planning to go away, check that any ashes are well and truly cold before you go. This might just save your property or your neighbour’s lives.

Alpacas with Maracas and kids!

FeatureJoanne Eisemann
Mole creek Primary School was visited by llamas to help celebrate National Simultaneous Storytime.  Photo supplied

Mole creek Primary School was visited by llamas to help celebrate National Simultaneous Storytime.

Photo supplied

By Jessica Marston, teacher librarian at Hagley Farm School

ON 22 May students from across the Meander Valley joined over 1 million children in Australia and New Zealand for National Simultaneous Storytime (NSS), all sharing the same book, Alpacas with Maracas by Matt Cosgrove.

This was the 19th year of the NSS, which is an event aimed at promoting the value of reading and literacy, the fun of books, and an Australian author and publisher.

Hagley Farm School took advantage of their own reallife alpacas with children from Kinder to Grade 6 enjoying a live-feed from the alpaca paddock.

Visitors’ Centre staff member Mr Tyson introduced the story with help from Maggie, Snowy, Noelle and Blinky Bill. This video can still been seen on the Hagley Visitor Centre Facebook page.

The children then watched the Story Box Library version of the story read by the author Matt Cosgrove and ABC TV identity Jimmy Rees (Jimmy Giggle).

At Bracknell Primary School, Mr Eeles read the story and Mrs Strickland provided the sound effects, while children were able to see the story unfold on the interactive whiteboard.

Mole Creek Primary School had visiting llamas for the day and made lots of alpaca themed crafts. They made their own maracas and even learnt and performed a song about alpacas with maracas!

Deloraine Primary School students were joined by Early Learners from the Toddle Inn Childcare Centre. Mr Samphier filmed Mrs Groenewold reading the story, adding lots of sound effects as well. As children watched this film in their classrooms they felt as if Mrs Groenewold was actually in the story.

Westbury Primary School Prep/1 and 1/2 classes walked to Westbury Library to take part in their NSS event. Anne-Marie Loader from the Deloraine Library kept them engaged with a lively reading of the book. Afterwards they shared library books together and made an alpaca collage.

Giant Steps students from Prep to Grade 12 watched the key-sign video and read along with the story. As well as following up with some craft activities, the children learned the key-signs for alpacas and maracas with some help from their speech pathologists.

At Our Lady of Mercy, Kinder to Grade 2 students followed up the story by making their own maracas using rice, disposable spoons and masking tape. The students then had fun playing songs with their maracas.

For those who didn’t get a chance to join in with the fun of this year’s NSS event, Westbury Show are planning to feature an alpaca display in November this year, which will likely include another

reading of this very engaging

book.

The biggest cuppa of all

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
Christine Donohue (left) and Sally Donohue (right) having their cake and eating it at the Biggest Morning Tea!

Christine Donohue (left) and Sally Donohue (right) having their cake and eating it at the Biggest Morning Tea!

By Wendy Laing

DELORAINE’S 2019 Biggest Morning Tea was held this year on 13 June.

The RSL clubrooms were abuzz with the happy sounds of approximately 100 people enjoying a morning tea of home-made sandwiches, cakes, slices and scones with tea or coffee.

Mrs Helen Horton and her husband Don initiated the first Biggest Morning Tea in Deloraine and continued running them for 20 years.

For the past two years, Helen’s daughter-in law Leanne Horton and Leanne’s two daughters, Danielle Donovan and Nicole Sherriff, have continued the tradition.

‘So many people have helped to make the Biggest Morning Tea a success this year,’ Leanne Horton said.

‘I would like to thank everyone who worked in the kitchen, supplied plates of food and donated items for the raffle.’

She also thanked the RSL for allowing them to hold the event in their clubrooms and the Information Centre for running off the fliers advertising the event.

Ms Kate Bennett from Westbury was thrilled when told she had won the raffle.

This year the successful Biggest Morning Tea raised the grand total of $1452 for the Cancer Council.

Piping hot and fresh from the garden

Community, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
From left, Tanya King, David Hudson and Howard Hor sampling soup at the community garden.  Photo by Mike Moores

From left, Tanya King, David Hudson and Howard Hor sampling soup at the community garden.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Hayley Manning

THE DELORAINE Community Garden has been transformed into a flourishing communal space that would have celebrity garden gurus jumping up and down in their gumboots.

And now in their own ‘War on Waste’ the garden volunteers are using excess produce to make soup. This happens every Wednesday and you are more than welcome to join them.

When the Gazette visited, volunteers clutched warming mugs of hot pumpkin soup and engaged in conversation, which as Guidance Project Officer, Tanya King, noted ‘is really what it’s all about’.

Tanya has been coordinating the garden since March 2017, and provides the daily activities on a work board.

She also supervises the Giant Steps students who have been lending a hand for a few hours every Wednesday since February.

‘They just love it. They pick and weed,’ she said.

‘The students also taste the soup first, then go off around the garden to try to find the ingredients they think have been used to make it.’

Volunteer David Hudson said they follow the ‘Plot to Plate’ principle of growing produce, picking it and cooking it.

He said it would be great to get more volunteers and community involved in the garden to share ideas, tips, and different gardening styles.

‘Everyone has gardening knowledge – pruning, weeding, composting.’

David said future plans for the garden may involve advanced cooking demonstrations.

If you are interested in becoming a garden volunteer please contact Tanya King at communitygarden@delorainehouse.com.au.

Scaling the heights with Rotary

Community, Events, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
John Zeckendorf, the first Tasmanian to reach the summit of Mount Everest.  Photo supplied

John Zeckendorf, the first Tasmanian to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

Photo supplied

By Hayley Manning

OPPORTUNITY USUALLY knocks once, so it’s time to get off the couch, shake out the winter chills and spend a special evening with the first Tasmanian to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

Entrepreneur, philanthropist, and adventurer, John Zeckendorf will give an informative and entertaining insight into Sherpas and what it takes to climb Mt Everest, the last mountain he completed on the Seven Summits list – the highest mountains in each of the seven continents.

But John says the evening is not just about listening to him. The real emphasis is on audience engagement and asking him questions that highlight the ‘human side’ of climbing that people don’t usually hear about.

Deloraine Rotary Club’s Lois Beckwith and the team are pulling out all the stops to transform the Rotary Function Centre. Lois said there will be long tables for clubs and organisations, group bookings, plus individuals … all are welcome.

Bar facilities will be available and a Nepali craft trade table. Supper will be provided at food stations featuring an assorted variety of chef-cooked, light curries. Side options will be provided for those who like to spice things up a bit.

All proceeds from the evening will help Rotary build a Youth Training Centre in Kathmandu to educate and empower disadvantaged youth, particularly vulnerable young girls. The young children are told: ‘If you don’t get a miracle; become one.’

John is an altruistic man and has long-held the belief that people should use their gifts and talents to help others where possible. He has auctioned carabiners (climbing clips), rocks, and bits and pieces from his Mt Everest tour to raise funds for Pathways Tasmania, an organisation that helps homeless youth battle addictions.

At a Tasmanian fund-raiser in 2017, $5000 was bid for a board mounted with a Mercury article and a rock, carabiner, and undies from John’s Everest trip.

Local MP Guy Barnett, who gave John three Tasmanian flags and advised him to ‘make sure you climb this thing’, has been invited to bring a surprise item for the Dutch auction, as have several other MPs.

Everyone is encouraged to bring an item for the auction to help make what promises to be a night with a difference.

Please contact Lois Beckwith for your donations of auction items.

For more information and bookings, contact Lois on 03 6369 5393.

Tickets: $25 per person
Rotary Function Centre,
Alveston Drive, Deloraine
7pm, 27 July 2019

Making a home for social justice

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
From left, Kristina Nicklason, Jai Homer and Krissy Bak, in front of Deloraine House, the hub of generous community service and activity.  Photo by Mike Moores

From left, Kristina Nicklason, Jai Homer and Krissy Bak, in front of Deloraine House, the hub of generous community service and activity.

Photo by Mike Moores

Over the years, there has been a lot more going on here than just a new coat of paint and renovations. It’s the heart and soul of the place that matters.  Photo supplied

Over the years, there has been a lot more going on here than just a new coat of paint and renovations. It’s the heart and soul of the place that matters.

Photo supplied

Deloraine House celebrates 30 years of community service

By Hayley Manning

HURRAH!

Deloraine House Inc. invites you to catch-up with past and present friends at their 30 year anniversary celebration on Saturday 31 August.

But it is more than a celebration – it is also a salute to the trailblazing community members who had the foresight to open a neighbourhood house and the courage to keep it going in the face of adversity.

The House was borne out of a lack of social services in the Deloraine Municipality, according to former Deloraine Councillor, Jan Blakeney, who reported there were people ‘doing it tough’.

Minimal government funding was available for upgrading resources in an area that had few opportunities in employment, education and training.

A member of ‘Wacky Walkers’ during the 1980s, Elaine Baldwin, remembers it wasn’t easy to try to start something like a community house in the early days.

‘People would say to me, ‘‘Oh the hippy house. Going to the hippy house are you?” Anyway, we got the “hippy house” up and running and I think now it is the most important thing in our town.’

Deloraine House was purchased in 1989 for around $60,000, through generous community donations and low-interest loans.

In the beginning, the community- owned House relied totally on volunteers until some funding for a family support worker was assigned. The first Coordinator, Kaye Williams was appointed in 1992 and funded for just 10 hours a week.

She was followed by Karan Jurs, then Polly Fowler, the longest serving Coordinator to date, with 13 years service.

‘Today there are five part time funded positions and numerous wonderful volunteers who we couldn’t function without,’ Acting Manager Kristina Nicklason said.

‘Deloraine House has evolved with the needs of the community. At first it was the base for the local environment group, The Deloraine Environment Centre.

‘The other focus was family support. It later added childcare, youth, health services and counselling and has continued according to the input of the people who have accessed it.

‘Today, activities are community development orientated – courses, food preserving and distribution, community gardens, regular group meetings and visiting services,’ said Kristina.

The festivities at the House on Saturday 31 August, from 11am–2pm, will appeal to everyone: music, face painting and PCYC Circus Trailer for the children, informative displays, photos and more.

Deloraine Lions Club will be present, cooking burgers, sausages and making sandwiches. Harvest Helpers are providing apple juice and pumpkins for soup and apple turnovers from the local glut. House volunteers are making soup, a cake and more.

All food and drink will be free. For catering purposes please RSVP Deloraine House. Phone: 03 6362 2678

A Thirty Years Panel will feature special guests: Julie Roach and Sue Chaston, past staff, house users and volunteers sharing brief snippets about their roles at the House and their vision for its future.

A commemorative artwork, by local artist Niecy Brown, will be unveiled.

For visitors who have travelled far and locals alike, Deloraine Deli is hosting an informal buffet-style dinner in the evening, 6–9pm. Bookings and prepayment of $35 per head are essential. Please phone the Deli on 03 6362 2127.

In good hands!

BusinessJoanne Eisemann
Chris Carpenter demonstrating his skills on Jess Bartholomew.  Photo by Hayley Manning

Chris Carpenter demonstrating his skills on Jess Bartholomew.

Photo by Hayley Manning

By Hayley Manning

A NEW remedial massage and natural therapies centre has just set up shop in the historic London House building on Emu Bay Road in Deloraine.

Acacia Healing’s Jess Bartholomew, offers Life/Vitality Coaching and Flower Essence Therapy, while Chris Carpenter provides a variety of massage styles.

A self proclaimed ‘climate refugee’ from Queensland, Chris visited Deloraine on his first day in Tasmania and met his partner, Jess.

The couple has since settled in the area, set up business and plan to eventually buy their own ‘patch of land’.

Reflecting their affinity with plants, the business is named after the Golden Wattle, whose bursts of fluffy yellow blooms herald the arrival of spring.

‘The first plant to flower in spring signals new life, new creation – that seems like a really good omen for us,’ Chris said.

Chris has always been naturally drawn to massage from a young age.

‘When I was a kid, if my parents had guests over to dinner, I would go around the dinner table after we had finished eating, and give them five minute shoulder massages.’

Advised by his family and following his heart, Chris completed Diplomas in Remedial/ Relaxation Massage and Shiatsu/Oriental Therapies – a good starting base.

Ten years experience and work on countless bodies, has resulted in Chris developing a unique massage style using a combination of all disciplines.

‘I am very flexible in my treatments. I can do anything from soft, gentle and relaxing, all the way to doing work on a toughened body builder who needs a lot of pressure,’ he said.

‘I am intuitive when it comes to reading bodies and the underlying cause of pain and discomfort, and then working on that, whether that be a crick in the neck, a bit of sciatica or lower back pain. If you come in with a specific problem, we will work on that to provide long-term pain relief.

‘I really love it. Changing people’s lives by healing them. It is really satisfying to me when someone comes in with pain and walks out feeling fantastic. What I want to do is fix people up, so they don’t need massage anymore, and basically work myself out of a job!’

For information and appointments, phone Chris on 0459 322 171, or visit www.acaciahealingtherapies.com.

A dog day out on the Village Green!

EventsJoanne Eisemann

NEW OCTOBER event, Paws on the Green is a fund raising day organised by Westbury Health Inc., with proceeds going to Let’s Read, the Smith Family early literacy program.

Pet-related organisations, food vendors, and anyone else who would be interested in joining them on the day are asked to get in touch.

The day will host dog races, dog jumping and other contests, training demonstrations and novelty events such as a grand parade with prizes.

There will be food, music and entertainment with free entry (donation collection) throughout the day.

St Andrews on the Green will host the Blessing of the Animals and Westbury Market on the same day.

Contact Paws at pawsonthegreen19@gmailcom or find us on Facebook at Paws on the Green, Westbury.

Heart and soul in Hong’s unique crafts

Arts and ReviewsJoanne Eisemann
Hong Ma, at the Deloraine Community shed, with one of her newest creations, a small wooden box inset with translucent green resin.  Photo by Mike Moores

Hong Ma, at the Deloraine Community shed, with one of her newest creations, a small wooden box inset with translucent green resin.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Lorraine Clarke

THE 2019 Tasmanian Craft Fair will honour the craftsmanship of Deloraine Community Shed artisan Hong Ma this year.

After reviewing examples of the woodwork articles that she creates with great flair, skill and love for our local timbers, it was determined that her work is of such a high standard that it deserves to be shared with the many thousands of visitors who visit the Fair.

Hong is delighted to have been chosen as the 2019 Emerging Artist, and to be invited to present her work in a central venue from November 1 to 4 this year.

The Tasmanian Craft Fair website quotes Hong’s passionate feelings about her art:

‘I love the natural beauty of wood. I feel sad to waste even one piece of it. I often use what other people consider as firewood. Many times, projects of mine have started by saving a piece of wood. Sometimes I have to wait a while for the timber to talk to me.

‘In my mind, wood is not the only beautiful part of the tree. Seeds, leaves and flowers can also be very pretty. So, in my work I like to experiment to display them together.

‘The using of resin has become very important to me for combining all these elements together.

‘Often, I will use colour pencils, woodturning shavings, food ingredients, or whatever else I may find to enrich my work.

‘I don’t like repetitions, so I always think to do something different, something unique. Every year I try to use different techniques or elements to come up with something different to what I’ve made before.

‘I love woodwork. It allows me to express my spirit.’

http://tascraftfair.com.au/news/articles/2019-emerging- artist

Walk on the wild side

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
The Rotary Club of Deloraine’s Wild Wood, tamed for walkers.  Photo supplied

The Rotary Club of Deloraine’s Wild Wood, tamed for walkers.

Photo supplied

WITH THE Meander River alongside, the small patch of woodland known as Wild Wood is a quiet and pleasant place to walk and contemplate the natural scenery.

The Wild Wood is owned and looked after by Deloraine Rotary. Tidied up, with mown trails and undergrowth cleared, the Wild Wood is waiting for walkers.

Home to native fauna, yet just a few short steps from the streets of Deloraine, at the southern end of the Caravan Park, you will see that somebody has been busy.

Hats off to MVFM 96.9

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
From left, Secretary Rijke McGough, Studio Manager / Vice President John Kenzie and Treasurer Tim Biggs picking a lucky winner out of the hat in the fortnightly Members’ draw at the radio station.  Photo supplied

From left, Secretary Rijke McGough, Studio Manager / Vice President John Kenzie and Treasurer Tim Biggs picking a lucky winner out of the hat in the fortnightly Members’ draw at the radio station.

Photo supplied

MEANDER VALLEY community radio station MVFM 96.9 is looking forward to another great year, thanking members and sponsors for their ongoing support that has enabled the station to keep broadcasting and serving the community, promoting local organisations, events and businesses.

This past year has introduced a new committee, a renovated studio, additional equipment, different programs and music content, plus more members and sponsors.

The fortnightly Members’ Draw is now well-established, with three different members enjoying their prizes as their names come out of the hat each fortnight – the chance to win a $25 voucher from Wholesome House, coffee and cake for two at Mummabuzz Café, or a free gym pass for two at Body and Soul Wellness Studio.

The second offer commences on 1 August – discounts at local shops and businesses on presentation of a current 2019/20 member card.

Membership renewals are due on 1 July 2019, or July 2020 if you have recently signed up, and cost $30 ($20 concession) a year.

Listeners are invited to offer feedback on the past year’s efforts, and/or to become involved as program presenters themselves. Everybody at MVFM 96.9 is a volunteer and would love to welcome new members to their ranks.

Membership forms are available from the station at 59-61 Emu Bay Road, Bendigo Bank, Wholesome House, Mummabuzz Café and Body & Soul Wellness Studio.

Completed forms and remittances can be left at the Bendigo Bank for collection.

A 2019/20 Member Card not only comes with great rewards, but helps to provide another year of exciting community radio as well.

Local author looks north

Arts and ReviewsJoanne Eisemann
web_2019_07_12_laing.jpg

SET IN the Northern Territory during the early 1960s, there is a good mix of the funny, everyday and tragic in Wendy Laing’s novel Memoirs of an Arresting Woman.

Arriving at police headquarters in Darwin, Constable Laurie McKenzie learns she is the only female officer in the Northern Territory Police Force.

Transferred to the outback town of Rabbit Creek, she has to deal with murderers, a paedophile, domestic violence and crocodile poachers as shestrives to earn the respect of the townspeople and her male colleagues.

Although there is a continuing thread throughout the novel, the scenes break down into enjoyable short stories. The town and its surroundings almost become another character, they are so well described.

This novel would appeal to readers of other fictionalised memoirs such as those by Gerald Durrell and James Herriot.

Sally Odgers, editor, manuscript assessor and author, describes Memoirs of an Arresting Woman as a thoroughly good reading experience.

Deloraine author Wendy Laing is Secretary of the Society of Women Writers Tasmania, writes for the Meander Valley Gazette and runs the Deloraine Writers Group.

Memoirs of an Arresting Woman is published by Indie-Mosh and is available through their website, or as an eBook on Amazon and Smashwords.

You can contact Wendy Laing on 0499 993 850 to purchase a signed copy.

Grab those guns and light sabers!

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
CJ Kilbride and Ken Bradford, both of Deloraine, showing off their martial skills in anticipation of this year’s Space Western showdown.  Photo by Mike Moores

CJ Kilbride and Ken Bradford, both of Deloraine, showing off their martial skills in anticipation of this year’s Space Western showdown.

Photo by Mike Moores

THE DELORAINE Winter Masque Ball is back again, continuing the tradition of local balls and dances that were centrally important to small communities, providing meeting places for neighbours, family, new friends and new love.

Waltzes, foxtrots and folk dances brought dancers together in mutual respect, allowed young folk to get to know each other, kept older folk active, and forged a strong sense of community in regional towns.

The new millennium brings a blending of old and new.

This year’s theme is ‘Space Western’ so break out the spacesuits, ball gowns and bling and dance the night away!

Learn with us, to waltz and ‘Strip the Willow’ to live local band ‘KentankRus’.

Win a prize for best supper dish or best mask. Be chosen Belle or Beau of the Ball.

The ball will be at the Western Tiers Community Club from 7pm, Saturday 27 July.

For more information or to volunteer to help on the night, call Megan on 6302 3372.

Address: Western Tiers Community Club, 33A Parsonage St, Deloraine.

Website: www.facebook.com/delorainewinterball.

Lamb Osso Bucco

Meander StyleJoanne Eisemann
Lamb Osso Bucco delivers wintry comfort food with lamb shoulder chops – Oz’s abundant alternative to ‘bones with holes’!  Photo by Wai Lin Coultas

Lamb Osso Bucco delivers wintry comfort food with lamb shoulder chops – Oz’s abundant alternative to ‘bones with holes’!

Photo by Wai Lin Coultas

By Wai Lin Coultas

A LOMBARD specialty, osso bucco traditionally braises veal shanks with white wine, broth, cinnamon and bay leaves, while modern recipes include tomatoes, celery, carrots and onions. Marrying the broth’s essence with a French love for flavouring casseroles with a bouquet garni, this recipe delivers wintry comfort food with lamb shoulder chops – Oz’s abundant alternative to ‘bones with holes’!

Slow cooked deliciousness – without gremolata but still perfect for rainy leisure weekends.

Ingredients

4 lamb shoulder chops (700g total)

2–4 tbsp plain flour

6 tbsp plus 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

2 brown onions, peeled and quartered

2 carrots, sliced

2 sticks celery, sliced

4 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced

1 cup white wine

1 cup seasoned beef stock

1 x 400g can diced tomatoes

180g streaky bacon, thinly sliced

12 pitted Kalamata olives, thinly sliced

1 cup frozen peas

300g Nicola potatoes, cut to 1.5 cm sticks

2g fresh thyme

3g fresh oregano

1 head lettuce heart, halved and outer leaves spread apart

iodised salt

cracked black pepper

Bouquet garni

4g fresh oregano

6g fresh thyme

10 cloves

4 bay leaves

1 sprig fresh dill

1 sprig fresh flat leaf parsley

Instructions

Coat lamb chops with flour seasoned with pepper and salt.

Brown chops in a casserole pot, with 6 tbsp oil heated over a high flame. Set aside.

In same pot, occasionally stir bacon until browned and crispy. Add carrots, onions, celery and garlic and stir until softened. Set aside.

Add wine to pot, cover and bring to boil. Scrape caramelised bits off the bottom.

Add tomatoes, stock, olives and bouquet garni, cover and bring to boil.

Return lamb, bacon and vegetables to the pot.

Bring to boil then simmer, covered, for 4 hours or until lamb is very tender and gravy has thickened.

Meanwhile, pre-heat oven to 220°C and roast potatoes for 40–45 minutes in 2 tbsp oil seasoned with salt, pepper and thyme.

When ready to serve, cover lamb with foil to keep warm.

Stir peas into piping hot gravy before seasoning with salt and pepper and removing bouquet garni.

Serve lamb and gravy with roast potatoes and lettuce heart, garnished with fresh oregano.

Serves 2

In the garden with Nell Carr

Meander StyleJoanne Eisemann
Rock roses and Scabious in the Commonwealth Bank garden on Emu Bay Road.  Photo supplied

Rock roses and Scabious in the Commonwealth Bank garden on Emu Bay Road.

Photo supplied

ROCK ROSES (Helianthemum) such as the one pictured in the Deloraine Commonwealth Bank garden in October, are both frost and drought resistant.

From Europe and North America, they are a valuable addition to a raised bed or rock garden, where they should have full sun.

They can be dug up and divided now while they are dormant.

The blue-flowered plant behind is a Scabious (Scabiosa caucasica), which enjoys similar conditions to the Helianthemum, except that in this position the foliage has developed a persistent mould – perhaps because there is insufficient air circulation.

In the food garden

Raspberry canes can be lifted and divided now, to just three or four canes. Cut them back, trim the roots and replant in well manured rows.

Rhubarb should be lifted every few years, before it gets large and clumpy.

Chop off a lot of the woody yellow root material and replant in a bed which has been enriched with well rotted cow manure.

Treasures from the soil

BusinessJoanne Eisemann
Len Mackenzie and his ‘black gold’ – truffles harvested at Needles in the Meander Valley.  Photo by Mike Moores

Len Mackenzie and his ‘black gold’ – truffles harvested at Needles in the Meander Valley.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Wai Lin Coultas

TRUFFLES OF Tasmania at Needles is Australia’s second largest truffle farm with 22,000 oak trees spread over 50 hectares.

Winter truffle season runs from late May until mid to late August, when fresh truffles are available. Year-round, the shop offers aromatic snap-frozen truffles, freeze dried granules, truffle powder, and their very own truffle pepperberry salt.

Culinary inspiration is found in The Truffle Cookbook by Rodney Dunn of The Agrarian Kitchen in New Norfolk, who includes the truffles on his menu.

There is an on-site tasting room and a shop that stocks everything from Italian-made stainless steel truffle slicers, clothing emblazoned with Truffles of Tasmania’s logo and truffle puppy soft toys.

Len Mackenzie, the farm’s owner, says ‘If you have come for a tour of the farm, we can take you out, meet the dogs and watch them work, and find a couple of truffles in the ground.’ During summer, demonstrations are organized by hiding harvested truffles or other objects for the dogs to sniff out.

Larger groups that book truffle hunts and tours in advance get a big food platter of seasonal local produce including truffle cheeses, venison, 41° South salmon, honeys and fresh raspberries.

There has been a constant flow of visitors to the farm, locals and overseas.

Launceston TAFE cooking school have brought students to the farm to learn about truffle growing and their culinary uses. ‘We offer this as a pro bono to experience, learn and taste what some students would be financially challenged to achieve in their own right now,’ added Len.

Tasting sessions and farm tours can be booked by calling 0400 067 093. You can drop by to shop or to pick up an order placed on trufflesoftasmania.com.au.

Lions roaring ahead

Business, RuralJoanne Eisemann
Mary Gill, of Westbury Lions, with a pallet of Lions’ bagged sheep poo, outside Westbury Rural.  Photo supplied

Mary Gill, of Westbury Lions, with a pallet of Lions’ bagged sheep poo, outside Westbury Rural.

Photo supplied

THE LIONS Club of Westbury is celebrating its twenty five year anniversary and still going strong, according to President Chris Viney.

Over the years Westbury Lions have been involved in numerous community projects, including renovating the clock at Holy Trinity Church in Westbury, Westbury Skate Park, the gates of St Mary’s Church at Hagley, the Westbury Showground gates and barbecue areas at both Carrick and Bracknell.

‘This year, our total contribution to the community has been over $15,000. That’s a pretty good effort for a club of our size,’ said Mr Viney.

Ongoing projects include collecting used spectacles for recycling in under-developed countries and collecting used stamps to raise money for the Lions Child Mobility Fund.

Lions also sponsor the UTAS Adrian Geard Memorial Nursing Scholarship, assisting a local person to pursue tertiary study and a career in a field vital to the community,\.

Manning the Agfest gates and assisting at the Mountain Cattlemen’s annual get together are other regular fund-raising activities.

Selling sheep ‘poo’ is another money making venture for Westbury Lions. Working bees are held to bag the poo, which is sold at Westbury Rural Services, with all proceeds going directly to Lions.

‘We really appreciate the ongoing support of Westbury Rural Services,’ said Mr Viney.

Membership has ebbed and flowed over the years but Mr Viney said there was always room for more. Of the original members, six are still active, twenty five years later.

The club is keen to attract more members, regardless of age or gender, and is a great way to serve the community.

‘We really need to get younger men and women on board so that the good work of Lions can continue,’ said Mr Viney.

Prospective members can get more information about Lions from Club Secretary Paul Kilroy on 0414 891 793.