Meander Valley Gazette

Your Independent Community Newspaper

Flowers and veg come full circle in Westbury

FeatureJoanne Eisemann
March 2019   The Westbury Garden Club Flower Show was once again a runaway success, attracting an estimated 700 entries. 300 people attended on the day with Lorraine Pasfield and R Mercer taking out the prize for Grand Champion Dahlia. As well as the many beautiful blooms on show there was also a selection of summer vegetables, including this unusually shaped marrow, held by Elena Tweedale 8 yrs of Westbury.   Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019

The Westbury Garden Club Flower Show was once again a runaway success, attracting an estimated 700 entries. 300 people attended on the day with Lorraine Pasfield and R Mercer taking out the prize for Grand Champion Dahlia. As well as the many beautiful blooms on show there was also a selection of summer vegetables, including this unusually shaped marrow, held by Elena Tweedale 8 yrs of Westbury.

Photo | Mike Moores

Tree top adventure

FeatureJoanne Eisemann
9-year-old Jez enjoys exploring the treetops at Hollybank during a retreat at Wonderland.   Photo | supplied

9-year-old Jez enjoys exploring the treetops at Hollybank during a retreat at Wonderland.

Photo | supplied

March 2019

MOLE CREEK is home to a special service for young people with disabilities, ‘Wonderland Retreat’. The Retreat, which has been open now for just over 14 months, provides short-term supported accommodation for younger people (ages 8 to 35 years) with NDIS plans.

Wonderland Retreat provides two programs, one involving recreational weekend activities and leisure, and the other providing a focus on life skills training mid-week. Rob and Toni Mehigan, Psychologist and ex School Principal, and owner/managers of Wonderland, have coined the term ‘adventure retreat’ as young people participate in an active program which includes learning archery at Beers Farm in Red Hills, animal appreciation and grooming with llamas from Llama Farma at Christmas Hills, visiting Trowunna Wildlife Park, fish feeding at 41 Degrees South salmon farm,  grooming horses at Nellie’s in Chudleigh, feeding the chooks on the 2 acre property, petting the therapy cat Sophie as well as innovative physical therapy outings to Air 360, mini golf, Go Karts at Latrobe, Tazmazia and Westbury Mazes, Hollybanks Tree Tops Adventure and caving tours at Mole Creek as well as short walks around the Western Tiers, to name a few.

On the property, young people participate in discos, karaoke, arts and crafts, haircare, makeup, glamour photography, woodwork and horticulture supported by friendly and experienced care workers. “Relationship skills are honed through having fun together,” says Kathryn Campbell – Community Liaison Offcer at Wonderland. “Our largest focus is simply having fun. Learning, growing as a person and having the courage to try new things is a lot easier with peers, especially where activities are supported to ensure no one is left out,” she said. 

“While at the retreat young people also learn to cook pizzas and other meals and learn barista skills at the Pepperberry Café as well as being taught house cleaning and bedmaking skills and other life skills relevant to the participants’ NDIS goals. Parents love us!,” Kathryn commented. Wonderland Retreat is also there for families when there is no other available support. 

Recently, a mum had to go for surgery and her young son spent 9 days at Wonderland with carers who followed an individually designed program over his time. He was particularly interested in making a stool for his sister and a lamp. He was able to create these things from scratch using recycled materials from the Mole Creek tip shop.

One young girl living with Huntington’s, a condition which affects motor and brain function, had lost her confidence in relating to peers. She was able to bring Grandma to the retreat staying in one of the Guesthouse family rooms so she could provide the necessary extra family support for her granddaughter in getting used to the new environment and building her confidence again. “I’ve found my peeps mum,” said one young visitor.

Another young person had lost confidence after being bullied at school. They had previously enjoyed singing and dancing but had become withdrawn and anxious. Her teary mother stated “she’s back” after coming to Wonderland Retreat, as she had found new friends and was able to be herself in the accepting environment. 

Wonderland provides many families in the district and beyond, with a ‘second family’ in a rural environment to back them up in parenting their young person with a disability, which can be a tough job’. Visit www.wonderlandretreat.com.au.

Trash turns into treasure

FeatureJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Maeken Danen

THROUGHOUT MY childhood here in Tasmania, my sisters and I would often have small projects around the garden and paddocks that required basic materials such as timber, pipe, bricks, and nails. Having limited funds for new materials, we turned to 2nd hand items and discovered that 80% of our needs where met at the local Deloraine tip. Needless to say, this became our favourite shop and still is for most of us, including me.

Trips to the tip are very fruitful. Not only can goodies be found in the shop area but also amongst the disposal piles.

Lengths of timber in excellent condition can be found in the wood pile as well as pallets which are great for turning into compost bins, keeping things off the ground or pulling apart, producing straight, even boards that can be used in a variety of DIY projects. Existing nails can even be taken out, straightened and reused if required!

The metals pile always has roles of old chicken wire. Whilst most is only good as plant guards or patch jobs, occasionally there is a piece good enough for a fence. We built several poultry pens out of just such wire. Not only was it good enough to keep the ducks and chickens in but also to keep the cows and goats out. Sheet tin was also a common find and there was always enough of different lengths without having to cut them up too much. Sometimes, when building, we would find that there were even holes pre-made in just the right spots!

The paint was another great collection. Many cans are just the remains of a larger project but are still perfect. We used only tip paint for our projects, one sister even scored a can with enough to paint the inside of her room!

Old fridges make great garden beds once the doors have been taken off. Drill a few holes in the bottom, turn it upside down and fill with dirt. Because fridges are so deep, you can fill the bottom half with chunks of woods, old cotton sheets, and weeds. They will be decomposed by the time that space is needed by the roots of plants. Chest freezers make excellent beds if you need an extra tall one but feel free to fill much of the space with inorganic materials as it may never be used by roots.

Bathtubs are also good garden beds but can also be used in hydroponic systems and as stock water troughs. They last a long, long time and best of all, can be fitted with plugs for easy cleaning! A friend of mine used bathtubs on his property in NSW for all his stock. With correct fittings, they are just as good, albeit smaller, than industrial concrete troughs. They are cheaper too!

The tip shop itself contains a wide range of things from an excellent array of ceramic basins - some brand new, clothes, including a great deal of bed linen in good condition which could otherwise be used for rags, picture frames, furniture that may only need a nail or two, doors, solid and fly-screen, toys and much more. The book and magazine section contain literature of many topics, from cookbooks, fishing magazines, health and diet as well as novels. Over the past several years, I have collected the entire Harry Potter series for 50 cents instead of $150+. I have also stocked up on all my folders, plastic sleeves and some lined workbooks for the coming school year.

There are also several shelves of kitchen utensils and appliances as well as nicely sized glass jars with lids that, with a good scrub, shape up nicely. The electrical appliances work more often than not. The teacup and tumbler collection is magnificent with a wide variety of colours and even matching sets to choose from. The glass jars are a favourite of mine because occasionally, there is a very unique and often very old jar with interesting designs on it that may work as part of a decorative piece or put in a wall. Be careful when purchasing plastic or metal with marks or rust as these can be difficult to clean and may contain unwanted germs.

With so many useful things lying around at the tip, it seems a waste to let them be carted off for processing. They can be used in so many creative ways and help cut down on the amount of waste we already have to deal with not only in Tasmania but in the world. And there must be more ways to use tip waste that I have not mentioned or even thought of. So maybe check out the tip next time you are out that way and see for yourself the plethora of goodies that can be found and reused at a great price!

Tip shop assistant Jess Wall of Deloraine with a selection of toilet suites and hand basins starting at $10.00.   Photo | Mike Moores

Tip shop assistant Jess Wall of Deloraine with a selection of toilet suites and hand basins starting at $10.00.

Photo | Mike Moores

Evacuation centre poised for action

NewsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Hayley Manning

THE TASMANIAN Government, in association with Tasmanian Fire Service and local councils, opened evacuation centres for those areas impacted by fires or threatening embers.

Meander Valley Council’s Social Recovery Coordinator, Patrick Gambles, in response to guidance and direction from Tasmanian State Emergency Services (SES) and other emergency services, activated the Westbury Town Hall Supper Room as an evacuation centre several times during the recent bushfire threat.

“Our role is to help the community get back on its feet by providing access to personal support, shelter and information. It could be as simple as come in and let us know you are safe and we will register you. We can help with immediate needs and for more substantial support we will bring in services like Red Cross, financial or health services, and ultimately, if people need somewhere to sleep, we have contingency plans to turn a hall like this into an overnight evacuation centre,” Patrick said.

“Regrettably, Council does not always have the time or resources to door-knock during an emergency situation so we work in partnership with volunteers from our six local service clubs, who can provide low-risk support, check on people in their home, help with clean-ups and do minor repairs.”

Patrick says the Council emergency management team has a strong association with Red Cross, and they appreciate the support of agents with training in psychological first-aid, evacuation centre management and all forms of disaster impact experience.

Emergency Services Manager Tasmania, Howard Colvin, says Red Cross staff help people complete a ‘Register. Find. Reunite.’ national registration service that informs Tasmania Police, other emergency services and loved ones of evacuation details (according to permission indicated at the time of register) – in the event that communications are compromised.

“In my experience, Meander Valley Council is one of the most switched on councils in Tasmania when it comes to emergency management,” Mr Colvin said. “They have engaged with Red Cross in emergency management, adapted some of our emergency management operational practices, and worked with us to train a range of community organisations in the joint recovery effort that follows.

“We see the benefits every time they respond to an event and the community can take comfort from the hard work the Council has put in.”

Patrick says while it is heartening to receive offers of goods and volunteer assistance, it is not practical due to the unpredictable nature of events.

The best way people can help is by registering to volunteer. To do so, please visit www.volunteering tas.org.au.

Patrick Gambles and Vicki Jordan, ready to offer assistance to those in need at Meander Valley’s Evacuation Centre in Westbury   Photo | Mike Moores

Patrick Gambles and Vicki Jordan, ready to offer assistance to those in need at Meander Valley’s Evacuation Centre in Westbury

Photo | Mike Moores

Chudleigh Show’s many faces

RuralJoanne Eisemann
Snow White Allen Atkinson cattle judge from Longford owner Adarie Bloomfield 8yrs.jpg
Top: Heifer, Snow White, owner Adarie Bloomfield of Longford and cattle judge Allen Atkinson.   Above: enthralled spectators.  Below: Bella Davies 5yrs of She­eld on ‘Maple’.

Top: Heifer, Snow White, owner Adarie Bloomfield of Longford and cattle judge Allen Atkinson.

Above: enthralled spectators.

Below: Bella Davies 5yrs of She­eld on ‘Maple’.

6I7A7957.jpg
Anna Shephard with 5-month-old Anglo Nubian goat ‘Peanuts’ at the Chudleigh Show   Photos | Mike Moores

Anna Shephard with 5-month-old Anglo Nubian goat ‘Peanuts’ at the Chudleigh Show

Photos | Mike Moores

March 2019

THE OFFICIAL opening of the 130th Royal Chudleigh Show 2019 was conducted by Mr Allan Cameron. First celebrated in 1889, Chudleigh Show is one of Tasmania’s oldest agricultural shows, showcasing local agricultural industries, fine local produce and entertainment.

With popular features including ute displays, vintage tractors, horse activities, wood chopping and the annual running of the Chudleigh Cup, the Show is a great day out for families and patrons to experience poultry, cattle, sheep, horses, dairy heifers and sheep dogs competing for “best of show”. In his opening speech, Mr Cameron paid tribute to all the people who worked over the years to make the show happen, congratulating the current committee and thanking the exhibitors, competitors, and ‘the horse people and the chopping fraternity who are a big part of the show’.

After thanking Home Industries, he noted the shortage of younger people helping with the show and made an appeal for them to become active if the show is to continue. “We who have been involved in Chudleigh Show over the years have seen it survive mainly because of the work done by volunteers and good management.”

Mr Guy Barnett also attended this year’s show, commenting on their importance to rural communities and reiterating the Hodgman Government’s advocacy of regional shows and their communities. As a long-time supporter of the Chudleigh Show, Mr Barnett was pleased to assist in providing a $15,000 grant for essential infrastructure and maintenance and another $4,730 grant under the 2018-2019 Tasmanian Government Agricultural Development Grants Program for commentary box and building upgrades.

Revved Up Day at the Creek

EventsJoanne Eisemann
L to R: Ange Weeks and Dee Lowry of Sheffeld testing brand new Harley Davidson Softails which were showcased at Mole Creek.   Photo | Hayley Manning

L to R: Ange Weeks and Dee Lowry of Sheffeld testing brand new Harley Davidson Softails which were showcased at Mole Creek.

Photo | Hayley Manning

March 2019 | Hayley Manning

MUSIC FESTIVAL goers went Radio Ga Ga at Mole Creek on Saturday 23rd February for the 2019 Day at the Creek. The town was a ‘hive’ of activity as a helicopter ferried joy flights overhead, visitors strolled along Pioneer Drive for coffee and the morning papers, and two brand new Harley Davidson Softails arrived to be showcased for the raffle. Mole Creek Hotel owners, Doug and Ramona Westbrook have tapped into Tasmania’s Crazy Little Thing Called Love for tribute bands.

They re-booked Killer Queen Experience to return as headliners after their performance at the 2018 Day at the Creek, along with Credence Clearwater Revival, Bowie and Elvis tribute acts – perfect for those who have not “experienced” the real artists or for people who just want to relive memories from the 70’s and 80’s. Modern-era audiences of all ages can’t get enough of Queen, whose iconic hits are enjoying a world-wide resurgence following the 2018 release of 20th Century Fox’s Bohemian Rhapsody.

The British rock band and lead singer Adam Lambert officially opened the 2019 telecast of the Academy Awards. Chair of Australian Rotary Health Tasmania, John Dare said the hoteliers have always donated to local organisations, but decided for the first time this year they wanted to raffle two identical Harleys, with all funds raised ($45,000) to go to Australian Rotary Health for research into Youth Suicide and Mental Health. Rotary District Governor of Tasmania, Ross Carlyle presented Doug and Ramona with the Paul Harris Fellow recognition at the event for their support. The Harleys were won by Luke McDonald and Woodrow Barstad.

In the Garden with Nell Carr

Meander StyleJoanne Eisemann
African Marigold is thought to be a twitch suppressant.

African Marigold is thought to be a twitch suppressant.

March 2019 | Nell Carr

PERENNIAL PLANTS have replaced the formerly popular bedding annuals in recent times, but annuals can still have their places in the ornamental garden, particularly when weeds like twitch grass are a problem. The bed can be completely cleaned out to make room for the next crop of annuals.

The frost and drought resistant African Marigold, Tagetes erecta (pictured), is an outstanding example - in fact, it is originally from Mexico. It is generally thought to be a twitch suppressant, but some additional research reveals that the essential oils have anti bacterial and anti microbial properties.

Additionally, seeds saved germinate freely if sown in seed raising mix in punnets, and planted in the garden bed, or large display vessels when they reach 5 or 6cms. in height. Regularly dead headed, they will bloom on through late summer and into March. Leave a couple of heads until they dry out and collect the seed for sewing next  Spring. All summer flowering perennials and shrubs should be dead - headed now to preserve their vigour.

In the Vegie Garden

Leeks, which revel in the coldest weather, are an essential ingredient for hearty winter soups. Sow seeds in seed raising mix, or buy punnets of seedlings, and plant in a  bed well prepared with organic matter with a mixed fertiliser added. 

Make holes 20cms apart with a rake handle and drop seedlings in the bottom, just covering the roots. Regular watering will slowly fill the hole with soil as the leeks grow.

Taste the excitement!

RuralJoanne Eisemann
Attend the festival for the chance to sample over 100 varieties of tomatoes, 15 varieties of garlic and cast your vote for the tastiest.

Attend the festival for the chance to sample over 100 varieties of tomatoes, 15 varieties of garlic and cast your vote for the tastiest.

March 2019

WHEN WAS the last time you popped a tomato in your mouth and experienced an explosion of flavour? Head along to this year’s Tasmanian Tomato and Garlic Festival and experience tomatoes as they were meant to be. Meet celebrity gardeners, Peter Cundall, Angus Stewart and Penny Woodward.

Peter will officially open the festival, Penny (Garlic Growing for Home Gardeners, 10 Things You Did Not Know About Tomatoes) and Angus (Soil Health, Pests and Diseases) will be guest presenters and a Q&A panel will include all three along with Annette from Tasmanian Natural Garlic and Tomatoes.

Tour the extensive garlic and tomato patch with over 130 varieties on show and then head to the tasting tent to experience tomatoes and garlic the way they are meant to be. Once inspired, mosey on over to the cooking showcase where David Ball, internationally renowned Executive Chef at The Glass House on the Hobart waterfront, will demonstrate amazing creations using heirloom tomatoes and garlic grown on the Reed property. Competitive? You can enter your sauce, relish, produce and even artwork in one of many categories: see details at http://bit.ly/tgf2019. Entries close at 11:30 am.

The judging panel includes international chef Paul Cundall. If Grandma’s secret relish recipe will beat all comers, or you’ve grown an unfeasibly large pumpkin, make sure you enter. The festival will have an abundance of food stalls, produce, great coffee and plenty to keep the kids busy with an animal nursery, activities, bush walks, live music

When: Sunday 17th March 2019 (gates open 9.00am, program runs 10.00am – 3.00pm) Where: 338 Four Springs Rd, Selbourne (follow the signs north from Hagley). Grand Opening: 10.45am featuring Peter Cundall. Entry: $10.00 adults, children free, dogs on leads welcome. Camping: Free overnight camping available – bus tours welcome.

Proceeds: to assist Tasmanian Women in Agriculture and Meander Valley Harvest Helpers. Details & schedule: can be found at http://bit.ly/tgf2019, or contact Vicki Jordan on 0400 155 690, or Cassie Jordan on 0408 593 281, or email garlic-tomato-festival-organisers@googlegroups.com.

Cats, rats & all take their toll

EventsJoanne Eisemann
A selection of Sarah Lloyd’s bird photographs will be on show at the Meander Valley Council o‚ces in Westbury and Pixels Digital Gallery in Deloraine until the end of March.   Photo | Sarah Lloyd

A selection of Sarah Lloyd’s bird photographs will be on show at the Meander Valley Council o‚ces in Westbury and Pixels Digital Gallery in Deloraine until the end of March.

Photo | Sarah Lloyd

March 2019 | Sarah Lloyd

TASMANIA HAS a special bird fauna, with many species found nowhere else. Some, the Tasmanian Native-hen, the Black Currawong and the largest honeyeater in Australia, the Yellow Wattlebird, are conspicuous. But others are easily overlooked - Scrubtits, Tasmanian Thornbills and Tasmanian Scrubwrens are cryptic birds of wetter habitats; the endemic honeyeaters (Yellow-throated, Strongbilled and Black-headed) forage high in the canopy of eucalypts and rarely descend to the understorey; and the tiny, leaf-sized Forty-spotted Pardalote is now only found in the woodlands of the south and south-east.

In the past two hundred years the Tasmanian landscape has changed irrevocably and there is no doubt that this has been disastrous for birds. Cities and towns are encroaching on bushland; agricultural activities, once restricted to the most fertile soils, are expanding and intensifying and native forests are being decimated to feed our voracious appetite for timber products. A wave of bird declines and extinctions is sweeping the planet and island populations are the most vulnerable.

Their inherently small size, vulnerability to habitat modification, fragmentation and introduced predators, especially cats and rats, and the changing climate are taking their toll. Birds are part of our everyday lives; we are captivated by their antics, beautiful colours and melodious songs.

They have crucial ecological roles in controlling insect populations, pollinating plants and dispersing seeds. Birds have an intrinsic right to exist; we can all play a part in ensuring they do.

A great set of wheels

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | David Claridge

THE DELORAINE Street Car Show gets bigger every year. The number of cars grows and the number of visitors coming through increases, benefitting local businesses and giving people a rare glimpse of motoring history.

For those wanting some extra fun, the show off€ered a Car Cruise and Mystery Garage visit the day before.

Those interested started at the 50’s Diner in Deloraine and then went on a cruise to a surprise garage to see someone’s prized collection.

Committee Member, Carl Mansfield, led the convoy to their mystery destination, a di€fferent one each year.

“There were one hundred cars on the cruise this year. The line went for kilometres as we made the journey,” he said.

“Many people come from Hobart and the mainland, so we have this to give them. It’s something else to see while they’re here.”

An estimated 500 cars were on display at the car show this year, and they were met with perfect weather.

Funds raised by the event are put back into the community through various organisations.

“We will give more away during the year when we decide where it’s needed the most,” Mr Mansfield said.

The Deloraine Car Show was an idea of a group of local businessmen including Carl, who wanted to bring business to Deloraine.

A magnificent muscle car visits Deloraine for the annual Deloraine Street Car Show.   Photo | Custom Street & Muscle Tasmania

A magnificent muscle car visits Deloraine for the annual Deloraine Street Car Show.

Photo | Custom Street & Muscle Tasmania

Cattlemen strut their stuff

SportJoanne Eisemann
Geo Harvey riding Tanbark Redpa of Westbury competing in the Roy Davies Memorial Stockman’s Whip Crack at the Harveydale gathering of the Mountain Cattlemen’s Association. The competition involves hitting 10 targets with your whip in a horse shoe design. Pictured below: Ruby Geach 12yrs with brother Lenny 6yrs compete in the junior whip cracking.   Photo | Mike Moores

Geo Harvey riding Tanbark Redpa of Westbury competing in the Roy Davies Memorial Stockman’s Whip Crack at the Harveydale gathering of the Mountain Cattlemen’s Association. The competition involves hitting 10 targets with your whip in a horse shoe design. Pictured below: Ruby Geach 12yrs with brother Lenny 6yrs compete in the junior whip cracking.

Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019 | David Claridge

WESTBURY GOT a country jolt in February with horses and stock whips gathering for some fierce competition. The annual Mountain Cattlemen’s event landed at Harveydale this year with hundreds of people coming to compete and watch.

Longford man Will Browning took home the Senior Championship, Victorian man Peter Hodgkin took second, while Sassafras local Ben Howe took third place. In the junior division, first, second and third were Westbury girls, Maya Scott, Georgia Burford-Rowe and Georgia Elias. TMCA Secretary Danza Hardwicke shared how gate takings were on par with previous years.

“There were a lot more day passes sold this year with the event being close to a town. We even had a couple of mainland competitors. “We have a championship of four stages, whip crack, handy stockhorse, cattle handling and an optimum time stock horse race. The competition was high, so it was a good event.

“This year we trialled an U12 event which got 14 children involved. 2019 was the 32nd  meet which moves around the state each year. The association, from their website, states that they actively try to pass down traditional stockman’s skills and are trying to protect high country heritage and traditions.

Breathing, laughing, living

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Hayley Manning

TO MOST people, yoga conjures up visions of chanting, sweaty bodies and limbs contorted into poses such as Downward Facing Dog, Reclined Cow Face and, of course, the Eight-point Shoulder Opener.

However, laughter yoga bears no resemblance to traditional yoga besides shared health benefits and a Hindu form of cultural greeting and/or parting from Sanskrit known as Namaste: “I bow to the divine in you”.

Attuned Vitality owner, Debby Kemsley describes her Laughter Yoga Club as “exercise for the soul” – designed to drive the stale air from your lungs, while creating a favourable environment for the happy, feel-good hormones - endorphins. Each 30 minute session features alternating sequences of laughter and breathing exercises, repeated over five rounds, followed by a pause at the end of each sequence.

“Laughing can increase the body’s endorphin levels to create a more positive attitude and generate a lot of energy. It can also lower the stress hormone cortisol, which can make people feel tired and unenergetic, without them even realising why,” Debby said.

Laughter Yoga Club will be at Deloraine House starting on 13th March, Wednesdays 9.00am for a 9.15am start. It’s free. Private and extra sessions also available. Contact Debby Kemsley: 0477 772 739.

From L-R Brenda Greichen, Debby Kemsley and Jilli Porter-Bains, all practice laughing yoga on a regular basis.   Photo | Mike Moores

From L-R Brenda Greichen, Debby Kemsley and Jilli Porter-Bains, all practice laughing yoga on a regular basis.

Photo | Mike Moores

Heritage celebrated through St Patrick’s day festival

EventsJoanne Eisemann
The Westbury St Patrick’s Day Festival will be held on the Village Green Saturday 16th March from 10.00am, entry by donation.   Photo | Mike Moores

The Westbury St Patrick’s Day Festival will be held on the Village Green Saturday 16th March from 10.00am, entry by donation.

Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019 | David Claridge

WESTBURY WILL be green in March with a family festival to coincide with Saint Patricks Day. After last year’s festival was cancelled due to planning problems, the committee has made sure 2019 will go ahead on the 16th March.

Secretary Amanda Taylor expressed how the annual festival comes about to celebrate Westbury’s Irish heritage. “We want it to be a family friendly festival. There will be local performers as we celebrate Westbury’s history. “It was settled by many Irish immigrants and convicts such as Richard Dry”, she said. Westbury in the 1820s was a garrison village.

The first settlers were mainly Irish ex-convicts, retired soldiers and free settlers. By 1850 it was the largest military community in Tasmania. Richard Dry was the largest landowner in Westbury. An ex-convict through political exile, he helped many Irish people set up in Westbury. His son became the first nativeborn Premier of Tasmania.

From the events Facebook Page: There will be a street parade at 10.ooam along with performers and food and craft stalls, a church market, vintage tractors and children’s activities. As previously published in Meander Valley Gazette, “The event’s new steering group is working hard to recreate a village festival that celebrates Westbury’s Irish heritage with an emphasis on folk tradition and rural activities.”

The festival will be at the Westbury Village Green from 10.00am - 4.00pm. Entry will be by donation.

Firing your creativity with clay

Arts & ArtisansJoanne Eisemann
A pottery hub has been developed at Deloraine Creative Studios thanks to a Tasmanian Community Fund grant, Denis Durham and the Meander Valley Council. Pictured is Trish Richers, the Pottery Hub Co-ordinator.   Photo | Mike Moores

A pottery hub has been developed at Deloraine Creative Studios thanks to a Tasmanian Community Fund grant, Denis Durham and the Meander Valley Council. Pictured is Trish Richers, the Pottery Hub Co-ordinator.

Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019

IT IS with great excitement that Deloraine Creative Studios (DCS) is announcing the completion and availability of our Pottery Hub. After 18 months of tireless work by the DCS executive committee President Sonja Grodski, Vice President Rod Russell-Stone and Treasurer Tracy Rolph, the vision of the Pottery Hub has come to fruition.

This would not have been possible without the support and backing of Mr Dennis Durham and the Tasmanian Community Fund. Mr Durham had the faith in the quality of our studios to finance the renovation and remodelling of the area into a beautiful space to house the Pottery Hub.

The executive committee applied successfully for a grant from the Tasmanian Community Fund for the purchase of a large kiln and associated furbishing. The Tasmanian Community Fund is an independent organisation that supports and strengthens Tasmanian communities by distributing funds to these communities.

The Meander Valley Council also provided a grant to enable DCS to acquire the extensive industrial shelving, benches and cupboards required for the Pottery Hub. With the above support DCS will now forge ahead to facilitate and administer access to the valuable local Deloraine and North-west district resource.

The Pottery Hub, located at 59-61 Emu Bay Rd Deloraine is a dynamic resource for the local and wider northwest Tasmanian community. It is available to both groups and individuals and is a space in which to share knowledge, acquire new skills and nurture creativity while interacting with a variety of potters and ceramicists, skilled and beginner alike.

Trish Richers is the Pottery Hub co-ordinator. Information and bookings for space, firings and classes is available by contacting her on 0407 930 342 or trish.richers@gmail.com. Beginner pottery classes in hand building will commence on Saturday 9th February.

Presently the activities on offer are:

1. Beginners classes

2. Hiring of space by individuals or groups wishing to hold workshops

3. Clay supplies

4. Kiln firings and hire of shelf space

Members of the public are welcome to come and view the Pottery Hub area during DCS opening hours and to discuss how the Hub can help them fulfil their creative ambitions.

Israeli-style chicken & rice

Meander StyleJoanne Eisemann
The bright colours of this indian style rice salad work well with the skewers of charry spiced chicken.   Photo | Mike Moores

The bright colours of this indian style rice salad work well with the skewers of charry spiced chicken.

Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019 | Wai Lin Coultas

THINK BARBECUE chicken and Israel’s street food comes vividly to mind; as do the equally delicious Indian tandoori. Marrying both’s best yields skewers of charry spiced chicken invitingly lifted by generous squeezes of caramelised lemon.

With a cold rice salad winsomely wedding Kosher ingredients with South India’s… ah, perfect for anticipating first hints of autumn.

Ingredients

600 g boneless chicken thighs, equally diced into 24 cubes

1 medium red capsicum, deseeded & sliced into squares

1 medium onion, peeled, vertically sliced into 6 & layers separated

1 lemon, vertically sliced into 6 wedges

Extra virgin olive oil

Iodised salt

For marinade

5 cloves garlic, peeled & minced

2 tbsp ground cumin

1½ tsp ground cardamom

1 tsp paprika

1 lemon, zested & juiced

2½ tsp maple flavoured syrup

Crack black pepper

For rice salad

6 handfuls of long grain white rice, cooked in seasoned beef stock & cooled

1 lemon, zested & juiced

½ tsp ground turmeric

120g baked cashews, dry toasted

80 g sultanas

40g fresh coriander, leaves roughly chopped

Dried chilli flakes

Instructions

1. Mix marinade’s ingredients, 2 tbsp oil and salt together to toss with chicken cubes for refrigerating covered overnight; soaking 9 wood skewers in water for as long.

2. When ready to skewer, toss onion and capsicum slices in oil and salt; wrapping soaked skewers’ blunt ends with aluminium foil.

3. Onto each of 6 skewers, thread 4 marinated chicken cubes, interspersed with slices of 2 oiled onion and 2 oiled capsicum; piercing skewer’s sharp end into a lemon wedge.

4. Thread remaining oiled veg slices onto 3 other skewers.

5. Barbecue skewers on hot plate till meat is cooked through; charring them over open flame to liking before removing foil.

6. For rice salad, mix lemon zest and juice with turmeric to stir 3 tbsp mixture through rice to yellow them; mixing in cashews, sultanas and coriander after, and sparingly, to taste, toss in chilli flakes.

Serves 2 to 3

A century of service

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Wendy Laing

A WEEKLY hospital visit is only one of the many activities members have undertaken over many years as volunteers with the Deloraine Branch of the Australian Red Cross. 100 people attended the annual fund raiser, a Devonshire Tea and raffle, held on the 31st January this year.

This raised $2,279, which President Lexie Young said would go towards charities throughout Tasmania, including bush fire relief. During the event, two members were honoured for their long service to the Red Cross.

The Northern Regional manager, Barbra Hill and the volunteer mobilisation coordinator Pippa French presented Joan Pedley with a gilt rosette for 60 years of service and Marilyn Day received an award for 50 years of service. A remarkable achievement.

Over the years, Joan Pedley and Marilyn Day along with all the members of the Deloraine Red Cross have raised money by working at fairs, door knocking and through the TeleCross program which was set up to help people who live alone and are at risk of an accident or illness that may go unnoticed. In particular, people who are housebound or may have a disability

L to R: Joan Pedley, Marilyn Day and Lexie Young of Deloraine Red Cross.   Photo | Mike Moores

L to R: Joan Pedley, Marilyn Day and Lexie Young of Deloraine Red Cross.

Photo | Mike Moores

The names of endearment

Meander StyleJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Mike Moores

MY NEIGHBOUR across the road refers to his wife as ‘dearly beloved’. This contrasts sharply with ‘ayatollah’ as a former colleague used to call his wife (what she called him is I’m afraid not printable!) After musing on this difference I wondered what other endearments might be used for our nearest and dearest, so I compiled a small list of names for him and for her, supplied by colleagues and friends.

For Him: Dead Leg, The fountain of all wisdom, himself, snotty clogs, Hitler, dear one. For Her: Bossy Boots, minister for war and finance, she who must be obeyed, the clerk of works, dear heart, my little flower.

If you feel so disposed the Gazette would love to hear from you with your pet name for your spouse. You may of course remain anonymous, however the Gazette cannot guarantee your safety!

Compassionate nation

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019

A NEW Red Cross survey reveals Australians are compassionate, with around two thirds (64%) of the population wanting to do more to help people in need. Kerry McGrath, Director Community Programs, Australian Red Cross said: “In the second year of our Red Cross survey, Australia is trending in a very positive direction, with the great majority of us wanting to help others, and even an 8 percent increase from last year.”

“Young people top the country, with eight of ten (82%) aged 16-17 saying they want to help others doing it tough. This is excellent news for the state of our communities, now and into the future.” “Australians are absolutely crying out to make a contribution, with more than one in two (56%) saying they genuinely want to do more locally, yet just over a third (38%) say they are actively connected and engaged.”

The new research coincides with thousands of volunteers hitting the streets for March’s Red Cross Calling Appeal. Every March, Red Cross Calling brings volunteers together to host events, knock on doors or donate to Red Cross Calling.

Any language anywhere

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019

EVER WANTED to learn a language? All you need is your library card.

Come along to the Deloraine Online Access Centre on Tuesday 26th March at 10.00am to 11.30am and discover how your library card provides access to Mango Languages and the opportunity to learn 70+ languages.

It’s great for travellers, business people or for anyone who loves learning new things. Who knows, you might be able to watch those foreign without the subtitles!

Participants can come, hear and look or they can use a computer and enrol. Bring your current Libraries Tasmania card & password (if you haven’t used your Library card in awhile, drop into the Library to update it & your password) and also bring an email address you can access at the centre.

This session is provided free of charge and morning tea will be provided, but please book a spot first by calling the Online Centre on 6362 3537.

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Travel to Ulverstone

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Over the fence

A COUPLE of events coming up in Ulverstone may be of interest to residents of Meander Valley. The first is a Mental Health and WellBeing Workshop for people 65+. Participants will be presented with the latest Australian and Tasmanian research finding on what is known to be important and meaningful to people, especially Tasmania.

Local priorities will be identified and local opportunities explored. Free workshop  9:30am through to 2:30pm. Catering is provided. Register at www.eventbrite. com/e/people-65-mental-health-wellbeing-workshop-tickets-53943495447 or call Roslyn Evenett 6421 3618 for more information.

The second is Back to the Future. Ulverstone’s North West Ecofest is being held on April 13th, 2019 – 10.00am to 4.00pm. The theme is Back to the Future: where the Wisdom of the past meets the innovation of the future. Entry to the festival is by gold coin donation. The festival offers an opportunity to engage with some local community groups, businesses and individuals who are willing to share expertise in the areas of sustainability, wellbeing and the environment.

Stalls, workshops and talks as well as food, buskers and children’s activities will complete the experience. Special guest is Tasmania’s very own “Food Guru” and Senior Citizen of the Year, Sally Wise. Bring your old batteries, mobiles, spectacles to be recycled. Cycle, walk, car share and don’t forget your own water bottle. Contact Anne 0407 614 985.