Meander Valley Gazette

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The biggest cuppa of all

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
Christine Donohue (left) and Sally Donohue (right) having their cake and eating it at the Biggest Morning Tea!

Christine Donohue (left) and Sally Donohue (right) having their cake and eating it at the Biggest Morning Tea!

By Wendy Laing

DELORAINE’S 2019 Biggest Morning Tea was held this year on 13 June.

The RSL clubrooms were abuzz with the happy sounds of approximately 100 people enjoying a morning tea of home-made sandwiches, cakes, slices and scones with tea or coffee.

Mrs Helen Horton and her husband Don initiated the first Biggest Morning Tea in Deloraine and continued running them for 20 years.

For the past two years, Helen’s daughter-in law Leanne Horton and Leanne’s two daughters, Danielle Donovan and Nicole Sherriff, have continued the tradition.

‘So many people have helped to make the Biggest Morning Tea a success this year,’ Leanne Horton said.

‘I would like to thank everyone who worked in the kitchen, supplied plates of food and donated items for the raffle.’

She also thanked the RSL for allowing them to hold the event in their clubrooms and the Information Centre for running off the fliers advertising the event.

Ms Kate Bennett from Westbury was thrilled when told she had won the raffle.

This year the successful Biggest Morning Tea raised the grand total of $1452 for the Cancer Council.

Piping hot and fresh from the garden

Community, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
From left, Tanya King, David Hudson and Howard Hor sampling soup at the community garden.  Photo by Mike Moores

From left, Tanya King, David Hudson and Howard Hor sampling soup at the community garden.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Hayley Manning

THE DELORAINE Community Garden has been transformed into a flourishing communal space that would have celebrity garden gurus jumping up and down in their gumboots.

And now in their own ‘War on Waste’ the garden volunteers are using excess produce to make soup. This happens every Wednesday and you are more than welcome to join them.

When the Gazette visited, volunteers clutched warming mugs of hot pumpkin soup and engaged in conversation, which as Guidance Project Officer, Tanya King, noted ‘is really what it’s all about’.

Tanya has been coordinating the garden since March 2017, and provides the daily activities on a work board.

She also supervises the Giant Steps students who have been lending a hand for a few hours every Wednesday since February.

‘They just love it. They pick and weed,’ she said.

‘The students also taste the soup first, then go off around the garden to try to find the ingredients they think have been used to make it.’

Volunteer David Hudson said they follow the ‘Plot to Plate’ principle of growing produce, picking it and cooking it.

He said it would be great to get more volunteers and community involved in the garden to share ideas, tips, and different gardening styles.

‘Everyone has gardening knowledge – pruning, weeding, composting.’

David said future plans for the garden may involve advanced cooking demonstrations.

If you are interested in becoming a garden volunteer please contact Tanya King at communitygarden@delorainehouse.com.au.

Scaling the heights with Rotary

Community, Events, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
John Zeckendorf, the first Tasmanian to reach the summit of Mount Everest.  Photo supplied

John Zeckendorf, the first Tasmanian to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

Photo supplied

By Hayley Manning

OPPORTUNITY USUALLY knocks once, so it’s time to get off the couch, shake out the winter chills and spend a special evening with the first Tasmanian to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

Entrepreneur, philanthropist, and adventurer, John Zeckendorf will give an informative and entertaining insight into Sherpas and what it takes to climb Mt Everest, the last mountain he completed on the Seven Summits list – the highest mountains in each of the seven continents.

But John says the evening is not just about listening to him. The real emphasis is on audience engagement and asking him questions that highlight the ‘human side’ of climbing that people don’t usually hear about.

Deloraine Rotary Club’s Lois Beckwith and the team are pulling out all the stops to transform the Rotary Function Centre. Lois said there will be long tables for clubs and organisations, group bookings, plus individuals … all are welcome.

Bar facilities will be available and a Nepali craft trade table. Supper will be provided at food stations featuring an assorted variety of chef-cooked, light curries. Side options will be provided for those who like to spice things up a bit.

All proceeds from the evening will help Rotary build a Youth Training Centre in Kathmandu to educate and empower disadvantaged youth, particularly vulnerable young girls. The young children are told: ‘If you don’t get a miracle; become one.’

John is an altruistic man and has long-held the belief that people should use their gifts and talents to help others where possible. He has auctioned carabiners (climbing clips), rocks, and bits and pieces from his Mt Everest tour to raise funds for Pathways Tasmania, an organisation that helps homeless youth battle addictions.

At a Tasmanian fund-raiser in 2017, $5000 was bid for a board mounted with a Mercury article and a rock, carabiner, and undies from John’s Everest trip.

Local MP Guy Barnett, who gave John three Tasmanian flags and advised him to ‘make sure you climb this thing’, has been invited to bring a surprise item for the Dutch auction, as have several other MPs.

Everyone is encouraged to bring an item for the auction to help make what promises to be a night with a difference.

Please contact Lois Beckwith for your donations of auction items.

For more information and bookings, contact Lois on 03 6369 5393.

Tickets: $25 per person
Rotary Function Centre,
Alveston Drive, Deloraine
7pm, 27 July 2019

Making a home for social justice

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
From left, Kristina Nicklason, Jai Homer and Krissy Bak, in front of Deloraine House, the hub of generous community service and activity.  Photo by Mike Moores

From left, Kristina Nicklason, Jai Homer and Krissy Bak, in front of Deloraine House, the hub of generous community service and activity.

Photo by Mike Moores

Over the years, there has been a lot more going on here than just a new coat of paint and renovations. It’s the heart and soul of the place that matters.  Photo supplied

Over the years, there has been a lot more going on here than just a new coat of paint and renovations. It’s the heart and soul of the place that matters.

Photo supplied

Deloraine House celebrates 30 years of community service

By Hayley Manning

HURRAH!

Deloraine House Inc. invites you to catch-up with past and present friends at their 30 year anniversary celebration on Saturday 31 August.

But it is more than a celebration – it is also a salute to the trailblazing community members who had the foresight to open a neighbourhood house and the courage to keep it going in the face of adversity.

The House was borne out of a lack of social services in the Deloraine Municipality, according to former Deloraine Councillor, Jan Blakeney, who reported there were people ‘doing it tough’.

Minimal government funding was available for upgrading resources in an area that had few opportunities in employment, education and training.

A member of ‘Wacky Walkers’ during the 1980s, Elaine Baldwin, remembers it wasn’t easy to try to start something like a community house in the early days.

‘People would say to me, ‘‘Oh the hippy house. Going to the hippy house are you?” Anyway, we got the “hippy house” up and running and I think now it is the most important thing in our town.’

Deloraine House was purchased in 1989 for around $60,000, through generous community donations and low-interest loans.

In the beginning, the community- owned House relied totally on volunteers until some funding for a family support worker was assigned. The first Coordinator, Kaye Williams was appointed in 1992 and funded for just 10 hours a week.

She was followed by Karan Jurs, then Polly Fowler, the longest serving Coordinator to date, with 13 years service.

‘Today there are five part time funded positions and numerous wonderful volunteers who we couldn’t function without,’ Acting Manager Kristina Nicklason said.

‘Deloraine House has evolved with the needs of the community. At first it was the base for the local environment group, The Deloraine Environment Centre.

‘The other focus was family support. It later added childcare, youth, health services and counselling and has continued according to the input of the people who have accessed it.

‘Today, activities are community development orientated – courses, food preserving and distribution, community gardens, regular group meetings and visiting services,’ said Kristina.

The festivities at the House on Saturday 31 August, from 11am–2pm, will appeal to everyone: music, face painting and PCYC Circus Trailer for the children, informative displays, photos and more.

Deloraine Lions Club will be present, cooking burgers, sausages and making sandwiches. Harvest Helpers are providing apple juice and pumpkins for soup and apple turnovers from the local glut. House volunteers are making soup, a cake and more.

All food and drink will be free. For catering purposes please RSVP Deloraine House. Phone: 03 6362 2678

A Thirty Years Panel will feature special guests: Julie Roach and Sue Chaston, past staff, house users and volunteers sharing brief snippets about their roles at the House and their vision for its future.

A commemorative artwork, by local artist Niecy Brown, will be unveiled.

For visitors who have travelled far and locals alike, Deloraine Deli is hosting an informal buffet-style dinner in the evening, 6–9pm. Bookings and prepayment of $35 per head are essential. Please phone the Deli on 03 6362 2127.

Walk on the wild side

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
The Rotary Club of Deloraine’s Wild Wood, tamed for walkers.  Photo supplied

The Rotary Club of Deloraine’s Wild Wood, tamed for walkers.

Photo supplied

WITH THE Meander River alongside, the small patch of woodland known as Wild Wood is a quiet and pleasant place to walk and contemplate the natural scenery.

The Wild Wood is owned and looked after by Deloraine Rotary. Tidied up, with mown trails and undergrowth cleared, the Wild Wood is waiting for walkers.

Home to native fauna, yet just a few short steps from the streets of Deloraine, at the southern end of the Caravan Park, you will see that somebody has been busy.

Hats off to MVFM 96.9

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
From left, Secretary Rijke McGough, Studio Manager / Vice President John Kenzie and Treasurer Tim Biggs picking a lucky winner out of the hat in the fortnightly Members’ draw at the radio station.  Photo supplied

From left, Secretary Rijke McGough, Studio Manager / Vice President John Kenzie and Treasurer Tim Biggs picking a lucky winner out of the hat in the fortnightly Members’ draw at the radio station.

Photo supplied

MEANDER VALLEY community radio station MVFM 96.9 is looking forward to another great year, thanking members and sponsors for their ongoing support that has enabled the station to keep broadcasting and serving the community, promoting local organisations, events and businesses.

This past year has introduced a new committee, a renovated studio, additional equipment, different programs and music content, plus more members and sponsors.

The fortnightly Members’ Draw is now well-established, with three different members enjoying their prizes as their names come out of the hat each fortnight – the chance to win a $25 voucher from Wholesome House, coffee and cake for two at Mummabuzz Café, or a free gym pass for two at Body and Soul Wellness Studio.

The second offer commences on 1 August – discounts at local shops and businesses on presentation of a current 2019/20 member card.

Membership renewals are due on 1 July 2019, or July 2020 if you have recently signed up, and cost $30 ($20 concession) a year.

Listeners are invited to offer feedback on the past year’s efforts, and/or to become involved as program presenters themselves. Everybody at MVFM 96.9 is a volunteer and would love to welcome new members to their ranks.

Membership forms are available from the station at 59-61 Emu Bay Road, Bendigo Bank, Wholesome House, Mummabuzz Café and Body & Soul Wellness Studio.

Completed forms and remittances can be left at the Bendigo Bank for collection.

A 2019/20 Member Card not only comes with great rewards, but helps to provide another year of exciting community radio as well.

Grab those guns and light sabers!

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
CJ Kilbride and Ken Bradford, both of Deloraine, showing off their martial skills in anticipation of this year’s Space Western showdown.  Photo by Mike Moores

CJ Kilbride and Ken Bradford, both of Deloraine, showing off their martial skills in anticipation of this year’s Space Western showdown.

Photo by Mike Moores

THE DELORAINE Winter Masque Ball is back again, continuing the tradition of local balls and dances that were centrally important to small communities, providing meeting places for neighbours, family, new friends and new love.

Waltzes, foxtrots and folk dances brought dancers together in mutual respect, allowed young folk to get to know each other, kept older folk active, and forged a strong sense of community in regional towns.

The new millennium brings a blending of old and new.

This year’s theme is ‘Space Western’ so break out the spacesuits, ball gowns and bling and dance the night away!

Learn with us, to waltz and ‘Strip the Willow’ to live local band ‘KentankRus’.

Win a prize for best supper dish or best mask. Be chosen Belle or Beau of the Ball.

The ball will be at the Western Tiers Community Club from 7pm, Saturday 27 July.

For more information or to volunteer to help on the night, call Megan on 6302 3372.

Address: Western Tiers Community Club, 33A Parsonage St, Deloraine.

Website: www.facebook.com/delorainewinterball.

A life of giving to others

Community, People and PlacesJoanne Eisemann
Kim Brundle-Lawrence of Carrick  Photo by Mike Moores

Kim Brundle-Lawrence of Carrick

Photo by Mike Moores

By David Claridge

HELPING THE community is something that has come naturally for Carrick lady Kim Brundle-Lawrence.

Ever since learning first aid from the Red Cross in grade 4 at school, Kim started on a path of volunteering which has resulted in 54 years with the Red Cross, 45 years with the Tasmanian Bands League (the majority of that time with the City of Launceston RSL Band) and nearly 30 years with the Tasmania Fire Service to name a few.

Kim is also President of Lifelink Samaritans.

Her roles have ranged from door knocking for the Red Cross March Appeal to helping with disaster relief in Tasmania and on the mainland.

In the Queen’s Birthday Honours, Kim was recognised for her many years of services to the community with the Order of Australia Medal.

‘People ask me how I prioritise … I ask myself who needs me more. Once I took my Red Cross bag in the back of a fire truck due to a town potentially being evacuated,’ she said.

‘It’s getting out there and helping people. I don’t have many ties at home now, so it keeps me busy.

‘While the award is really nice for me and I’m stoked about it, I see it as recognition of not only me doing work but for all volunteers doing work. It’s an acknowledgement to all of us.

‘I wouldn’t be able to do this without the support from the families I have across the various groups.’

Kim was awarded Honorary Life Member of the Red Cross in December 2018, which sits with the many other accolades she has collected over the years.

Kim Brundle-Lawrence has received the Order of Australia Medal in the Queen’s Birthday Honours for her many years of services to the community.

Sandwiches, soup and a silent auction

Events, CommunityJoanne Eisemann

THE ANGLICAN Church of Quamby Parish is conducting a Silent Auction to raise funds for the continuation of the historic churches in this parish.

A Silent Auction is a fun way for everyone to bid on a range of items.

Each item has a form for you to enter your bids.

There will be a large range of goods including professional photos of local interest, hampers, garden items, bags of compost, linen, toys and books, to mention a few.

Some items will have a below value starting price, but there will be lots of great bargains. EFTPOS facilities will be available and payment is required on the day.

Hot soup and sandwiches can be purchased for just $10 with drinks at bar prices.

The date is now Saturday 3 August and the venue is Westbury RSL at 7 Lonsdale Promenade.

Bidding will take place between 12 noon and 2pm.

Come along, enjoy some soup and sandwiches, have fun and take home a bargain!

Enquiries Rosalie 0427006842.

Saturday night games

CommunityJoanne Eisemann

NOTHING TO do on Saturday night?

Every Saturday night, the Deloraine Online Access Centre is open at scheduled times, when computer games can be played for a donation of $2.

From 4–6pm is for those under 15 and from 6–9pm is for those over 15.

Games vary between the age brackets and availability.

Over-15s have access to titles such as Call of Duty and under 15s have access to Warcraft 3, The Frozen Throne and the mods included.

Games night is looking to expand but that will be dependent on continuing public interest.

Small steps, giant results

Community, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
Michael Nicholson and Terri Walker of Giant Steps, working with the communication app Proloquo2Go.  Photo by Mike Moores

Michael Nicholson and Terri Walker of Giant Steps, working with the communication app Proloquo2Go.

Photo by Mike Moores

GIANT STEPS in Deloraine recently received a $5000 grant from Aurora Energy as part of its Community Grants Program. This has enabled the school to purchase brand new iPads and specialised apps to assist students who have difficulties with communication.

The Proloquo2Go and LAMP apps are used at Giant Steps to give non-verbal students (who cannot talk) and minimally verbal students the voice they need to communicate. Children point to the symbols or words on the apps and the iPad then ‘says’ the word that they have pointed to.

Using these apps, the students can put sentences together to express their ideas and wants.

These apps have also been shown to support the ability of the student to understand what is said to them.

Terri Walker is one of two speech pathologists at Giant Steps who are using iPads and apps for what is known as Alternative Augmentative Communication (AAC).

Developed overseas, these apps can have a vocabulary modified for Australian students.

Words and images can be restricted or ‘masked’ for younger students or those who are just beginning to communicate and can be expanded or ‘unmasked’ as students progress.

There is a large range of communication skills across the students at Giant Steps The iPads and different apps that are available assist the teaching staff to extend these skills.

‘For a student to be able to ask to go outside and play, to say they are hungry or even to say ‘hello’ to people is empowering and they are more able to develop relationships with others if they can communicate,’ said Giant Steps Principal Tim Chugg.

Students on the autism spectrum, even when very talkative, still respond better to visual cues rather than aural. They often perform better in the classroom, learning more quickly if they communicate and receive input visually as well as verbally.

Autism often causes a ‘motor planning problem’ – a child knows what they want to do or say, but has difficulty getting their body to respond. The use of the communication technology (AAC systems) does not stop students from ever talking.

Research has shown that the opposite occurs and it will help develop talking skills in many non-verbal students.

Giving students a voice means they are able to express themselves through words rather than behaviour.

Students who move to mainstream schools may continue to need visual cues to help them study and navigate a confusing environment.

World Autism Awareness Day is held on 2nd April every year. Software can be bought for half price to assist families to provide their children with the tools to communicate with the wider world.

At your service

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
Tristan Webb and Shane Dale (right) from Deloraine Trade Training Centre.  Photo by Hayley Manning

Tristan Webb and Shane Dale (right) from Deloraine Trade Training Centre.

Photo by Hayley Manning

By Hayley Manning

‘SERVICE ABOVE Self.’

The Rotary slogan captured the collective sentiment of the volunteers who attended the National Volunteer Morning Tea on 23 May at Deloraine House.

The occasion was officially opened by Mayor Wayne Johnston and OAM recipient, Merrilyn Young, who said the community needed more young volunteers. ‘It is not all hard work. You make friendships for life, while helping others,’ she said.

The day room full of volunteers mingled to the lively beats provided by U3As Strummers and Drummers.

Hardy’s ‘Frogs’ Bakery made the Meander Valley Council funded cake, Linc funded the lunch, which was catered by Deloraine House with Deloraine Trade Training Centre volunteers serving.

Here are some of Meander Valley’s dedicated volunteers.

Kathryn Bryan

‘I did my Certificate 3 in Community Service and want to do Cert 4 via TAFE to get into welfare work. I love meeting people at Deloraine House.’

• Deloraine House Reception

• Deloraine Footy Club

• Junior and Amateur Basketball

Lydia

‘I Iove meeting new people and being involved in the community.’

• Literacy volunteer for Linc Tasmania

• Community Visitor Scheme for Aged Care

Paul Kilroy

‘Meeting people and being useful to others as part of community. Satisfaction. Fun. Mixing with other like-minded people.’

• U3A Golf organizer

• Movie Club Exercise Group

• Lions Club

• Strummers and Drummers

Russell Witcombe

‘The rewards are fantastic and far outweigh the effort. You come to realise how much the same people do, five days a week.’

• U3A golf

• Cycling group

• Westbury Baptist Church Kids Club

• Westbury Rotary

• Strummers and Drummers

Tristan Webb

‘I like serving the food and doing the clear away afterwards.’

Shane Dale

‘I enjoy working with food and gaining work experience today.’

• Shane and Tristan are both doing the Core course Certificate 2 in Hospitality at Deloraine Trade Training Centre.

Thinking globally, protesting locally

Community, NewsJoanne Eisemann
Student climate action protest on polling day, in Deloraine.  Photo by Mike Moores

Student climate action protest on polling day, in Deloraine.

Photo by Mike Moores

IF YOU have seen Adani protesters in Deloraine over the past few weeks, you may have wondered why Tasmanians are bothered by a proposed coal mine in Queensland.

You may also have seen this small group of concerned young locals, protesting on the Saturday of the Federal election. Too young to vote, but old enough to be concerned about how their elected representatives are going to manage their future.

Recreation re-creation for Westbury

Community, Sport, NewsJoanne Eisemann
Westbury Recreation Ground development.  Supplied by MVC

Westbury Recreation Ground development.

Supplied by MVC

By David Claridge

WESTBURY RECREATION Ground is a-buzz with activity since work started in April with parts of stage one being ticked off.

A 100-seat capacity function space is coming together as stage one with more works planned to be completed by July.

Following that, there will be new lighting installed, change room facilities, space for umpires, a medical room, eight showers and equipment storage space amongst many other upgrades.

The Meander Valley Council distributed a media release to explain that the upgrades have begun and are currently going to plan.

‘The development is being undertaken in two stages so that the existing clubrooms remain operational for as long as possible,’ Mayor Wayne Johnston said.

The Meander Valley Football Club has announced on their Facebook page their excitement for the $440,000 upgrade from the State Government’s Levelling the Playing Field Grant Program.

The upgrades to the ground and clubrooms will help them to a standard that will support the growing female participation at the club.

Taking a shot at flu

Business, CommunityJoanne Eisemann

2017 WAS the worst flu season ever recorded in Australia.

With over 47 000 notified cases in 2018, this was considered to be one of the mildest seasons, possibly because of increased immunisation uptake and general population immunity carried over from 2017.

Although the 2019 flu season has only just begun, there have been 25 deaths in Queensland already, according to Queensland Health figures reported by ABC News on 15th May.

Influenza changes constantly and is not predictable. Flu is a viral infection that infects the respiratory system (nose, throat and lungs).

Anyone, at any age is susceptible to flu, even the young and healthy. It spreads quickly and flu viruses constantly mutate so annual vaccinations are recommended.

Symptoms include fever, chills, sore throat, fatigue, muscle aches, headaches, runny nose, coughing, and sneezing. Children may experience vomiting or diarrhoea.

A flu carrier can be contagious 24 hours before symptoms appear and for about a week afterwards. Most people recover from flu within a couple of weeks, but flu can cause complications such as pneumonia or bronchitis and may even be life-threatening.

A flu vaccination is available for free in Tasmania, for children from 6 months to 5 years old and for those over 65 or medically at risk.

Anyone else visiting a GP or chemist for a vaccination will have to pay for it.

Deloraine Medical Centre has vaccinated well over 1000 patients already, this season.

Chemists are now able to provide customers with a flu vaccination, but not as part of the free service, although it is hoped that this will become available in the future.

At $19.95 for a flu vaccination, Amcal Deloraine and Soul Pattinson Westbury have a steady stream of customers, who do not have the time or inclination to make doctors’ appointments.

A chemists’ vaccination is done by trained staff. The vaccination can be added to a customer’s medical records, to keep them up to date.

Vaccination is the most effective protection against flu, so should be considered a reasonable precaution to take before the season is upon us.

You should speak to your GP or local chemist if you have any health concerns about flu or vaccinations.

The Gazette editor, taking one for the team, courtesy of Deloraine Medical Centre.  Photo by Mike Moores

The Gazette editor, taking one for the team, courtesy of Deloraine Medical Centre.

Photo by Mike Moores

OneCare near the oceanside, Rubicon Grove

Community, People and PlacesJoanne Eisemann

By Wendy Laing

RUBICON GROVE is a residential aged-care facility situated at Port Sorell and was first opened in 2009. Since then it has grown not only in size but also the ability to provide low, high and palliative care on both a respite and residential basis.

After a $5.6 million redevelopment earlier this year, amongst other renovations and refurbishments, Rubicon Grove now boasts a state-of-the-art kitchen area, a community centre and, Rubi’s Tea House.

Each of the single residential rooms has a private ensuite and an internal courtyard. There is a cosy lounge in each of the four residential wings with tea and coffee making facilities, where residents can relax or entertain family and friends.

A life-style manager coordinates over fifty volunteers, who spend one-to-one time with residents and help with a range of undertakings, including driving the community bus, gardening, shopping expeditions and craft activities.

The new community centre is an integral part of Rubicon Grove, not only for residents but also as a hub for various neighbourhood events, meetings and activities.

Round the clock nursing care is always available to residents who need assistance, including medication, exercise and dietary requirements.

OneCare’s Rubicon Grove nursing home is at 89 Club Drive, Port Sorrell, within walking distance of the Shearwater shopping precinct.

For further information visit their website www. agedcareguide.com.au/onecares- rubicon-grove or phone (03) 6427 5700.

Rubicon Grove facilities include a cafe for residents and guests.  Photo supplied

Rubicon Grove facilities include a cafe for residents and guests.

Photo supplied

Blooming marvellous!

Community, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
From left, Wendy and Roger Travis along with Helen Clarke, President of Westbury Garden Club, planting bulbs outside the White House in King Street, opposite the Village Green, Westbury.  Photo by Mike Moores

From left, Wendy and Roger Travis along with Helen Clarke, President of Westbury Garden Club, planting bulbs outside the White House in King Street, opposite the Village Green, Westbury.

Photo by Mike Moores

THE WESTBURY Garden Club has coordinated the planting of over 3,000 bulbs in May, at the eastern entrance to the town and beneath more than 200 street trees.

The Garden Club contributed $1000 for the purchase of bulbs, in addition to the many that were donated by the community.

A $3000 grant from Meander Valley Council and the involvement of the Council’s Works Department allowed the project to be expanded, complementing Council’s street tree plantings.

With donations and help from throughout the Westbury community, the bulbs will create an annual display that can only enhance Westbury’s considerable street appeal.

Netballs and highballs

Community, SportJoanne Eisemann
Left to right: Jess Cowan, Shannon Styles, Penny Hooper, Morgan Goninon, Hannah Marshall, Eric Izbicki.  Photo by Jaden Watts

Left to right: Jess Cowan, Shannon Styles, Penny Hooper, Morgan Goninon, Hannah Marshall, Eric Izbicki.

Photo by Jaden Watts

Left to right: Amy Warren, Beth Taylor, Elisha Williams and Hayley Patten.  Photo by Jaden Watts

Left to right: Amy Warren, Beth Taylor, Elisha Williams and Hayley Patten.

Photo by Jaden Watts

THE MEANDER Valley Netball Club recently held a highly successful cocktail party at the Hadspen Memorial Hall.

This year the club is fielding five teams in the Northern Tasmanian Netball Association.

The ‘family friendly’ club trains at Prospect High School and Hagley Primary School, but due to the large number of players, the club has found it difficult to find adequate training facilities within the Meander Valley municipality.