Meander Valley Gazette

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All four paws on the Green!

People and Places, CommunityJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Mike Moores  Clover Ward and her mother Sarah, show off the skills of Laken, their 3 year old Border Collie. Clover and Laken will be demonstrating dog agility and obedience at Paws on the Green, on Saturday 19 October. From 11am until 3pm, this inaugural festival of all things canine promises to be a day full of fun, with races and high jumps, dog treats and competitions, entertainment, food and much more for dogs and people alike.

Photo by Mike Moores

Clover Ward and her mother Sarah, show off the skills of Laken, their 3 year old Border Collie. Clover and Laken will be demonstrating dog agility and obedience at Paws on the Green, on Saturday 19 October. From 11am until 3pm, this inaugural festival of all things canine promises to be a day full of fun, with races and high jumps, dog treats and competitions, entertainment, food and much more for dogs and people alike.

Innovative plan for church villas

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
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By Sharon Webb

A PLAN to build villas on Anglican church land in Deloraine is almost a certainty after the planning application was passed by Meander Valley Council.

Funds raised by the sale and rental of the eight villas to be built adjacent to St Mark’s Church on East Westbury Place in Deloraine will cover the church’s funding obligation to the National Redress Scheme for children sexually abused in institutions.

The plan is the result of an innovative collusion between St Mark’s parish council and Traders in Purple, the company behind Ridgeside Lane in Evandale and Kingston Park in Kingston.

Traders in Purple, along with Rytenskild Traffic Engineering, MRC Engineering, Lange Design, Michael Jirku Architecture, PDA Surveyors, are working pro bono to deliver the project.

St Mark’s minister, Reverend Joshua Skeat, said the parish council and his congregation are encouraged by the council approval of the application and excited by the prospect of the project becoming reality.

Council received only one representation from a nearby resident, confirming that a comment on the safety of the entrance to the complex was valid and therefore instructing that the proposed entry and exit locations be swapped.

The land for the villas, historically known as The Saleyards, and St Saviour’s Church in Meander originally had been listed for sale by Tasmania’s Anglican Diocese to cover the parish’s obligation.

The parish council paid the redress money out of parish funds to have time to make considered decisions about the land and St Saviours.

They decided to develop the Saleyards land and to consult the Meander community on the future of St Saviours Church. It is expected that work will begin early next year, to complete in November 2020.

Find your family at the Tasmanian Craft Fair

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Mike Moores  Josh and Ashley Porter with Ella, Arlo and Abby, all dressed up. Tara Badcock generously assisted with the loan of costumes courtesy of Deloraine Dramatic Society.

Photo by Mike Moores

Josh and Ashley Porter with Ella, Arlo and Abby, all dressed up. Tara Badcock generously assisted with the loan of costumes courtesy of Deloraine Dramatic Society.

A NEW York Times columnist once reported, ‘If you want a happier family, create, refine and retell the story of your family’s positive moments and your ability to bounce back from the difficult ones. That act alone may increase the odds that your family will thrive for many generations to come.’ (Bruce Feiler, 15 March 2013).

This year’s Tasmanian Craft Fair will include a new exhibit to help people do just that.

Hosted by the international genealogy non-profit organisation FamilySearch, the exhibit will include free one-on-one help to enable visitors to start or grow their family tree.

Simple and innovative online tools, tips and displays will enable interested family historians to share their family stories in fun and engaging ways.

The official opening on Saturday at 2pm will feature a 40-minute cultural presentation from the Tongan Youth Dance Group of Tasmania.

In addition to the daytime activities, visitors are also welcome to enjoy family movies on the big screen on Friday and Saturday at 6pm.

On Sunday at 6pm, Child Safety Services will deliver a special presentation on how you can offer hope and healing to families in our own community through foster care.

Gallery 1 is located at the FamilySearch Centre at 153 Emu Bay Road and will be open every day of the Craft Fair. Take the bus or park onsite. All activities are free of charge and suitable for people of all ages.

Guests can also access fresh drinking water, clean toilets, indoor and outdoor seating, and a large outdoor fenced area which is great for picnics!

For more information 0n the weekend’s activities, contact Liz Walker on 0428 072 010.

History has deep roots at Westbury Primary

Community, Events, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
Photo supplied  The Badcock and Rootes families have a long history at Westbury Primary. Back row: Kim Rootes (nee Badcock) 1972–1976; Brian Badcock 1944–1950;Natalie Brown (nee Rootes) 1999-2005. Front row: Zoe Brown 2016–present; Lily Brown 2019.

Photo supplied

The Badcock and Rootes families have a long history at Westbury Primary. Back row: Kim Rootes (nee Badcock) 1972–1976; Brian Badcock 1944–1950;Natalie Brown (nee Rootes) 1999-2005. Front row: Zoe Brown 2016–present; Lily Brown 2019.

THIS OCTOBER, Westbury Primary School will celebrate 180 years of education with a Birthday Fair.

Multiple generations of local families have attended the school and current and former students will be able to have their names associated with the school permanently with the purchase of pavers to be laid in the school’s quadrangle.

Up to three names can be put on each paver and the cost will be $10 for current students and $50 for former students (per paver). Pavers can be purchased at the fair on the 25th October in the history room. Funds from the pavers will help upgrade of the canteen facilities at the school.

Five generations on both sides of Natalie Brown’s family (the Rootes and the Badcocks) have attended the school.

‘We have gone back as far as my great grandfather, Ernest Rootes who attended Westbury Primary School around 1896,’ said Natalie. ‘We have such a connection to the school and the area that my children Zoe and Lily currently attend the school. The children at the school are caring and friendly and the village is so community minded. We can’t wait to celebrate this milestone in October.’

For information on Westbury 180 go to the Westbury180 Facebook page or email Westbury180@outlook.com.

Hidden treasures and some marvellous monotremes …

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
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Treasures of the Meander Valley The Meander Valley 100 Day Challenge is well underway with 30 students, teachers and community volunteers and up to 100 inspiring locals working together on Meander Valley Treasures.

This student-led initiative will focus on celebrating inspiring local people.

The students believe treasures come in many forms and ages and have defined a treasure as: a person who is an icon in the local community; someone who has made a unique change to the local community; a leader of a group or club; someone who holds important information about the history of the community; someone the students are intrigued by; or just someone who makes you feel good.

The students will interview, film and photograph local treasures for the purpose of feeling more connected to their local community and letting people know they are appreciated for the good things they do and the interesting lives they lead.

Supporting the students in their endeavour, Mr Aaron Gilligan, Year 9 and 10 Coordinator at Deloraine High School, said, ‘I’m excited to work together with students as they bring to light the hidden treasures within our community’.

Plastic and platypuses don’t mix

This will be one of the lessons that Mole Creek and Deloraine students will learn when Australia’s ‘Professor Platypus’ visits them later this month.

Dr Geoff Williams, biologist and co-founder of the Australian Platypus Conservancy APC, is giving special platypus education classes to Deloraine and Mole Creek primary and secondary schools on Monday 28 October.

Dr Williams is touring northern Tasmania with fellow biologist and co-founder of the APC, Dr Serena Melody, to promote monitoring and protection of local platypus populations and habitat. The pair have been invited to Meander Valley by Project Platypus, another student-led 100 Day Challenge initiative co-designed by students, teachers and local community volunteers.

About the 100 Day Challenge

The 100 Day Challenge is a community-driven, student-led collaboration of young people, teachers and volunteers from the local community, working together to provide hands on learning opportunities for students.

At a recent community workshop focused on youth engagement and mental health, students chose the theme of ‘hands on learning’ and came up with the ideas of Meander Valley Treasures and Project Platypus as two of five key projects to assist students to find more meaningful pathways of study or employment beyond Year 10.

The 100 Day Challenge is a project supported by Westbury Health, The Van Diemen Project, Devil’s Advocate, Deloraine High School, Collective ed. and Meander Valley Council.

Further information can be obtained from Kristen Toohey, Community Engagement and Communications Facilitator, Collective ed. on 0417 043 032 or by email to kristen.toohey@ beaconfoundation.net.

Creative women

Community, Arts & Artisans, FeatureJoanne Eisemann

By Hayley Manning

THE TASMANIAN Craft Fair, held annually in Deloraine, is an opportune time for visitors and locals to look around and find the artists who live and work in the Meander Valley all year round.

Deloraine Creative Studios on Emu Bay Road is a hub for all sorts of artists and craftspeople who work from their own creative spaces within the building. Other artists and craftspeople sell their art through the Studios and Pottery Hub.

All photos by Hayley Manning

Karen Scott-Hoy from Hawley Beach is a volunteer at the Studios and a Pottery Hub artist. She is adept at ceramic sculpture and carving large and miniature items from Huon pine, often combining the two to great effect. Karen recently took up needle felting, a technique that involves stabbing felt wool with barbed needles in order to bind the wool fibres together to create a solid fabric. She is currently making a series of Australian birds using locally sourced supplies from Highland Felting and Fibre.

Karen Scott-Hoy

Karen Scott-Hoy

In Studio 10, Leanne Ames of Migrimah Arts completed a TAFE Diploma of Art and Craft Design at four years ago. She creates her pieces with creative knotting, weaving and sumac, using natural, biodegradable materials, inspiration coming from Tasmanian old growth forests, the earth, mosses and ferns. Leanne uses a natural dye process with bush leaves and the use of fire. ‘I feel connected to a very ancient past, that is elusive, spiritual and a wonder.’

Leanne Ames and grand-daughter Alyssa Lord

Leanne Ames and grand-daughter Alyssa Lord

Marilyn Patton of Studio 14 is a retired social worker who enjoys painting still life, flowers, landscapes, portraits and commission work. She travels from Ulverstone every fortnight and welcomes visitors to watch her paint. Marilyn was a finalist in the inaugural Women’s Art Prize Tasmania last year, and will submit another painting in October this year. ‘I come here quite a lot because I like to be here and interact with others. You know, when you get older, if you isolate yourself so much, it’s not good for you.’

Marilyn Patton

Marilyn Patton

Busy as bees at Mumma Buzz

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Mike Moores  Buffy, Natalie Woolford and Carolyn Bussey behind their fabulous cake cabinet at Mumma Buzz Café.

Photo by Mike Moores

Buffy, Natalie Woolford and Carolyn Bussey behind their fabulous cake cabinet at Mumma Buzz Café.

By Hayley Manning

NAMED AFTER its owner Carolyn Bussey, Mumma Buzz Café and takeaway offers an all-day menu catering to all food requirements – including vegan, vegetarian, coeliac and a gluten-free cake cabinet.

‘We have a big enough café area, but we are still small enough to have that personal interaction with people and get repeat customers because of our attention to detail,’ Carolyn said.

Carolyn and co-owner, Darren (Buffy) have enclosed the deck area at the rear of the café with transparent floor to ceiling awnings that block unwelcome breezes while still allowing unhindered access to the stunning views.

The deck is now an intimate space that can be used for dining, or booked for a special celebration or meeting.

Inside the café, artwork courtesy of local Gallery 5 artist Fiona Francois provides a backdrop on the walls.

Carolyn started the business in December 2018, and gives full credit to Narelle and Craig Lovell for setting the precedent with Nelly’s Café.

‘Some of Nelly’s staff stayed on and taught myself and the new staff how to run the business.

‘We are all in the process of learning the various stations from making coffee, prep, sink, serving, hot and making desserts, so we never know what we will be doing when we arrive. We are loving it. All the staff is here to ensure the customers have an enjoyable experience. I am thrilled to bits – they do a fantastic job.’

A three course Sri Lankan Night with Chef Ruwan has been planned for 14 October. Pre-bookings are essential.

In the Garden with Nell Carr

Community, Meander StyleJoanne Eisemann
Photo supplied  White Kunzea, Kunzea ambigua

Photo supplied

White Kunzea, Kunzea ambigua

A STORY from Rebecca Morris in The Examiner of 21 June 2019, describes the commercial values of four Tasmanian native plants.

The most valuable appears to be the shrub Kunzea ambigua, (White Kunzea, pictured here). The oils from this exude a powerful fragrance which is used for aromatherapy. A cream made from its oils is useful for pain relief.

An example of this shrub may be seen in the native street bed at the Great Western Tiers Visitor Information Centre, Deloraine. It should be flowering by the time the Gazette is distributed.

In the article, the chief executive of Essential Oils of Tasmania (EOT), writes, ‘The health benefits of Tasmania’s native plants, particularly kunzea, have been understood by the traditional owners of this land for many thousands of years, so it’s exciting to … explore their potential’.

The berries from the Tasmanian native pepper, Tasmannia lanceolata, which grows along the lakes in the Highlands, can be used for food flavouring, and as an anti-oxidant.

Another aromatic plant from the Highland areas, the endemic Boronia citriodora, bears in its crushed leaves a powerful citrus scent.

The article also mentions a plant the author calls Southern Rosalina, which research reveals is the common swamp paperbark Melaleuca ericifolia, common in poorly drained areas in Northern Tasmania. In early summer, its scented white flowers resemble a layer of snow lying on the top of the foliage. The Flinders Island strain is apparently the best source of aromatic oils.

In the vegie garden

There are few vegetables which cannot be grown in October. Celery is a useful vegetable both raw in salads, or cooked in soup. The minute seeds are best started in punnets in seed raising mix, and planted out when they are 3cm in height. They take two to three weeks to germinate (keep them well watered), and three or four months to harvesting. They need liberal amounts of animal manure or compost, and regular watering during summer months.

Correction

In September’s issue of the Gazette, I said Acacia dealbata was Black Wattle. It is actually Silver Wattle.

Native plant jewels at Blooming Tasmania

Arts & Artisans, CommunityJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Sharon Webb  Deloraine artist Kylie Elkington features native plants in her work exhibited at Blooming Tasmania’s exhibition at the UTAS Academy Gallery at Inveresk.

Photo by Sharon Webb

Deloraine artist Kylie Elkington features native plants in her work exhibited at Blooming Tasmania’s exhibition at the UTAS Academy Gallery at Inveresk.

By Sharon Webb

THE TINY flowers of Tasmania’s native plants painted by Deloraine artist Kylie Elkington took pride of place in an exhibition to launch Blooming Tasmania’s recent show.

Admirers of roses and rhodos, including Tasmania’s Governor, the Honourable Kate Warner, gazed into the greenness of Kylie’s depiction of Mountain Pinkberry and Carpet Frillyheath to discern shy jewel-like flowers secreted in foliage.

‘My work highlighted the native plant aspect of Blooming Tasmania. It was a treat to talk plants and gardens with Professor Warner,’ Kylie said.

‘My art is autobiographical, a record of where I’ve noticed ubiquitous but often overlooked tiny flowering plants. I aim to draw close attention to the light, detail and understated beauty of plants that may be witnessed by people hiking and moving through the Australian landscape.’

The exhibition, entitled The flower show – birth, death and everything in between, is open daily at the UTAS Academy Gallery at Inveresk until October 25.

Curated by Dr Malcolm Bywaters and Dr Kim Lehman, it also features work by Les Blakeborough, Angela Casey, Fiona Chipperfield, Susannah Coleman-Brown, Leoni Duff, Deborah Malor and others.

Prof. Warner, now appointed to another year in office, told the launch audience that she is working on the garden section of a book on Government House.

‘The Plimsoll Native Garden is a recent addition to Government House. Unfortunately Sir James died in office before it was completed,’ she said.

‘The Queen planted a Huon Pine there in 1988 and the Duke of Edinburgh a Blackwood tree.’

Kylie, whose 2019 Glover Exhibition entry was one of two winning highly commended awards, said Dr Lehman had chosen her work for Flowers having seen it in Hobart’s Colville Gallery.

‘Two of the three works I included in Flowers are new. I think they were a good fit,’ she said.

Deloraine House 30 plus!

Community, People and PlacesJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Mike Moores  Elena Olah and Debbie Smith with Deloraine House’s new bird bath.

Photo by Mike Moores

Elena Olah and Debbie Smith with Deloraine House’s new bird bath.

ON THE last day in August, Deloraine House celebrated 30 years in the community and the little house on the corner was filled with laughter and stories of days gone by.

Over the day, close to 200 people came through the door, walking the halls and rooms that were covered in photos of the last three decades.

With music from the Ukarythmics, Lisa Yeates and Rob van der Elst, food from the Deloraine Lions Club and delicious apple juice from the Meander Valley Harvest Helpers, the back yard was a buzz of busy children running around and having fun. Adults sat around chatting and taking in the delectable smells of the vegetarian BBQ cooked by former volunteer Geoff Zwar.

Special thanks go to Deloraine Golden Opportunity Shop whose kind donations funded the event and the Deloraine Bendigo Bank for donations that went towards the children’s activities.

Some highlights were the unveiling of a mosaic bird bath by Niecy Brown and the sharing of memories from people including Polly Fowler, Nell Carr, Julie Roach and Sue Chaston.

The event wouldn’t have been possible without the wonderful Deloraine House volunteers, who put many hours into creating a fantastic event. Charlie Keane made a huge cake for all to share, as well as spending a whole day cooking soup and other things with Elena Olah and Jan Post.

Kristina Nicklason, Marilyn Day and Jan Post deserve a special mention as they worked so hard to bring everything together.

It was wonderful to see so many people celebrating the strength and connections in the community. It is exciting to dream of how the community will shape Deloraine House into the future.

156th Westbury Show flying higher than ever

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
Photo supplied  Kate and Rosie Chugg with their prize winning sheep at the Westbury Show.

Photo supplied

Kate and Rosie Chugg with their prize winning sheep at the Westbury Show.

THIS YEAR, Westbury Show is thrilled to have the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) as their show charity and the CEO of the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Mr John Kirwan will open the show.

The RFDS will showcase the RFDS Aeromedical Simulator and offer fun for adults and children alike by using exercise bikes to make healthy Fender Bender Smoothies. Other special play activities include virtual goggles for children.

RFDS staff and volunteers will provide information on their new Primary Health Care Services for the Meander Valley, including dental and mental health. RFDS fundraising merchandise will be available.

Entertainment will include music and the Maypole Dancers from Westbury Primary School, the U3A Ukulele Singing Group, Fiddle Stix and Taiko Drummers.

As well as the animal nursery there will be Seedhouse’s exotic birds, a reptile display and some miniature goats to meet. Alpacas will feature this year with Hagley Primary School children learning to show these charming animals.

Hagley Rural Youth will run a dog high jump competition and Laser Tag is a new and adventurous addition to the free kids’ corner. A new and exciting 6-bar horse jumping event will offer $1000 prize money to help raise awareness of Parkinson’s Disease.

Displays will include steam engines from Pearn’s Steam World, the Carnival Organ, vintage cars, trucks, tractors and the Westbury Butcher.

Home Industries always has a wonderful display of art, cooking and photos with a special feature this year for Westbury Primary School’s 180 year celebration. Home Industries schedules can now be obtained from the Soul Pattinson Chemist at Westbury.

Gates open at 8.30am on Saturday, 9 November. Entry fees: $10 adults, $5 children 6 to 16, free under 6 and $25 family. Visit www.westburyshow.com. au for further information: or contact Stacey Tweedale, Communications Manager, Westbury Show on 0413 453 567 or at staceytweedale@ gmail.com.

Aikido, the peaceful art

Community, Arts & ArtisansJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Hayley Manning  Bodhi McSweeney and Martin Bratzel practising the art of Aikido.

Photo by Hayley Manning

Bodhi McSweeney and Martin Bratzel practising the art of Aikido.

By Hayley Manning

‘THOSE WHO are skilled in combat do not become angered, those who are skilled at winning do not become afraid. Thus the wise win before the fight, while the ignorant fight to win.’ O Sensei Morihei Ueshiba (1883– 1969).

Aikido, the Art of Peace, is a modern martial art created by Japanese Master Morihei Ueshiba. Despite being a powerful warrior, he was opposed to fighting aggression with aggression and viewed world peace as a better alternative.

Deloraine Aikido Aiki Kai School instructor of 30 years, Martin Bratzel, said the non-competitive martial art is based on strength building and natural movement.

‘We teach our students conflict resolution and harmonious methods of aggression control without hurting the attacker. Not surprisingly, it is ideal for corporate team building and school bullying.’

Aikido is an interactive way for individuals, families and children over eight to learn effective self defence, while rolling, stretching, getting fit and becoming more centred.

The Deloraine Aikido Aiki Kai School led by founder and Australia’s highest ranking Master Tony Smibert, will be hosting a free trial session on 16 October between 5 and 6pm.

Those interested should contact Bohdi McSweeney for more information on 0409 695 321.

The risk of dementia in Tasmania

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
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THE WICKING Dementia Research and Education Centre at UTAS has recently launched the ISLAND Project, the largest dementia prevention project in the world.

The Project aims to give Tasmanians the knowledge and information to self-manage personal risk factors known to increase risk of dementia. Spreading the word is vital to making the ISLAND Project a success so the Project is asking for support to sign up over 10 000 Tasmanians over 50 years of age.

To register interest or find out more about the project go to https://islandproject.utas. edu.au/, or contact island@ dementia.utas.edu.au or 6266 6977 for more information.

Recycling concerns for Meander Valley?

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
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By David Claridge

A RECYCLING slump across Australia has had a flow on effect where waste is unable to be processed as it was in many areas.

Business heavy weight SKM Recycling in Victoria has become insolvent in August after a $5.5 billion debt as reported on abc.net.au.

Meander Valley Council was asked if there is any impact in our community to alleviate concerns. MVC Communications Officer Marianne MacDonald provided answers to these questions.

Where does our recycling go?

‘Most recyclable materials are processed in Tasmania or interstate. After initial processing, product is distributed to local and international markets.

’Given that recycling businesses are struggling and extra costs will most likely go to council and ratepayers, is our recycling under threat? ‘

Council is unable to predict changes in market demand for recyclable commodities, however, the current market is still viable.

‘Council is informed of emerging developments for reuse opportunities and continues to be proactive in engaging with multiple stakeholders.

‘The community does a great job in recycling various materials and Council encourages all its residents to continue to recycle.’ If so, what is Council doing to combat the issue? ‘

‘Council continues to work with other councils in the region to improve recycling opportunities and has recently contributed to the State Government’s Draft Waste Strategy Action Plan consultation.’

The Mercury in early September reported that ratepayers in the Hobart City Council area would be funding an extra shift to deal with excess waste as the SKM shutdown has adversely impacted their ability to relocate waste to the mainland. In the interim they have been stockpiling the waste at their facilities.

A pint and a platypus

Events, CommunityJoanne Eisemann
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By Anne Gillies

MEANDER’S MARVELLOUS monotreme, the platypus, will be the subject of a pub session with a difference later this month.

Free public platypus information sessions will be held at the Empire Hotel in Deloraine on Sunday 27 October at 3pm and the Mole Creek Hotel on Monday 28 October at 3.30pm.

The talks, which are suitable for all ages, will be given by two of Australia’s top platypus biologists, Drs Geoff Williams and Serena Melody.

The pair, who founded the Australian Platypus Conservancy 25 years ago, want to recruit locals to monitor and protect the local platypus population using the Conservancy’s new website and app – see www.platypusnetwork.org.au.

Deloraine and Mole Creek would make ideal monitoring locations, according to Dr Williams. ‘It is a really unique environment; some locals literally have platypus living in their backyards,’ he said.

‘Because people in the Valley live around platypuses, they may have observed behaviours that not even we scientists know about.’

For further information, please contact Anne Gillies at agilles62@me.com or on 0431 630 348.

Valley launches into action for the 100 Day Challenge

Community, EventsJoanne Eisemann
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THE 100 Day Challenge launched into action recently when Meander Valley community members gathered at the Western Tiers Community Club to discuss the future of youth engagement and mental health, helping to identify the major issues impacting on the youth of today.

Deloraine Primary and High school students were present to voice their concerns about mental health issues and engagement in learning ‘real world life skills’ such as understanding home finances and mortgages and how what they learn in school applies to their futures.

The workshop identified several key areas while working with the two themes of hands on learning and youth mental health. In the spirit of co-design, the participants chose to work with the theme of hands on learning for the 100 Day Challenge.

Discussions focused on how the community could draw upon local resources and create actions that would be completed within 100 days. The overall goal is to make a long-lasting impact on the future of young people by creating sustainable and measurable changes in the Meander Valley.

‘The Meander Valley community should give itself a huge round of applause for the enthusiasm and commitment that was so evident at the workshop’, said Bob Muller, from Devil’s Advocate Consulting.

The workshop produced several potential ‘actions’ that will help to get students engaged with community and into practical, experience-based projects such as careers events, wilderness adventures and mentoring programs.

Year 11 and 12 students from Deloraine High School said that the workshop was good for meeting new people and learning about the ideas that the community have.

‘It was really fun. They were really encouraging for us to share our ideas. They really wanted to know what we liked to do.’

The 100 Day Challenge is a community driven project supported by Westbury Health, The Van Diemen Project, Devil’s Advocate, Deloraine High School, Collective ed. and Meander Valley Council.

Further information: Victoria Homer, Collective ed. Lead on 0400 526 806 or email victoria.homer@beaconfoundation.net.

Garden pride and joy

CommunityJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Mike Moores  Luke Cole at the Deloraine Community Garden with the new mower, courtesy of a community grant from the Meander Valley Council.

Photo by Mike Moores

Luke Cole at the Deloraine Community Garden with the new mower, courtesy of a community grant from the Meander Valley Council.

LUKE COLE has been mowing the grass at the Deloraine Community Garden since March 2018.

He does a great job, and takes a lot of pride in keeping the garden looking neat and tidy.

The old lawn mower has done a great job, but was old and tired, and was needing increasing maintenance to keep it going.

A grant from the Meander Valley Council’s community grants program, has made it possible to upgrade the mower for the Community Garden.

Nell Carr – a remarkable life

People and Places, Community, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Mike Moores  Nell Carr, in the garden at the Western Tiers Visitors Centre which she tended for many years with the Garden Girls and where she is now garden consultant.

Photo by Mike Moores

Nell Carr, in the garden at the Western Tiers Visitors Centre which she tended for many years with the Garden Girls and where she is now garden consultant.

By Hayley Manning

A LARGE contingency of the Deloraine Days for Girls were joined by other well-wishers to present Nell Carr with the Rotary Paul Harris Fellow, at the Bush Inn on 12 August.

The award was presented to Nell in acknowledgement of the countless hours she has dedicated to volunteer work over her remarkable life. From Meals on Wheels to Secretary of the Deloraine Film Society, she has thrown herself into many varied roles over the years.

And despite recently reaching her 93rd year, the dynamo has no immediate plans to retire from the volunteer positions that reflect her long-held passions in life – education and gardening.

Nell is a Deloraine House Community Garden Volunteer, and continues to maintain the Commonwealth Bank garden.

Meander Valley’s very own garden guru, Nell tended the Great Western Tiers Visitor Centre garden with the Garden Girls for many years, and has been appointed garden consultant.

The third of six children, Nell Carr grew up on the Dunorlan farm founded by her father on land made available for servicemen who had served in the Great War. Her mother was the daughter of a neighbouring farmer. Nell, her husband and first two children returned to Tasmania from Scotland in 1953. She has lived on the farm ever since.

A writer for the former Great Western Tiers local newspaper, Nell currently writes the knowledgeable gardening column for the Meander Valley Gazette.

Nell organised short courses that included gardening with the former host of the ABC’s Gardening Australia, Peter Cundall, when she introduced and coordinated Adult Education courses in Deloraine.

The Gazette recently contacted Peter who was delighted to hear about Nell’s ongoing activities. ‘The Nell I know and love is an absolute inspiration, a modern-day philanthropist of the gardening universe,’ Peter said. ‘

My personal list of all-time great gardening minds would read: Jane Edmanson, Costa Georgiadis, Don Burke, Jamie Durie, the groundskeeper at Keilor East Recreation Reserve and Nell Carr.’

Nell, the long-term advocate for education joined Days for Girls in 2015, to make sanitary products so Nepalese school girls ‘don’t have to miss school a few days each month.

‘I have met such very interesting people in Days for Girls. As you get older, it’s more important to relate to your fellows.

If everyone stopped volunteering, the whole community would fall to bits, I’m afraid.’ Nell Carr, MVG 2015

Nell recalled aspects of her own education during her award evening speech. ‘Our father being a poor soldier-settler, could only afford to send my three sisters, two brothers and myself to high school for three years each, as it meant paying board for all of us in Launceston.’

After high school, Nell landed her first job in Launceston as a messenger girl. ‘The only qualifications were that I had a bike. But no experience is wasted – it gave me an intimate knowledge of the CBD.’

A young Nell met her husband-to-be, a Scotsman in the Navy, and they married in Sydney before going to Scotland to live. After several years, the couple and their small two children, Deidre and Geoffrey returned to the Dunorlan farm to build a family home, where sons Alistair and Clive were later born.

Nell’s interest in further education was piqued when she read her daughter’s UTAS Hobart study notes. She said if uni ever became available in Launceston she would enrol.

First year university classes were eventually offered at the Adult Education building in High Street, Launceston.

The courses Nell completed there were acknowledged when she completed an off-campus Bachelor of Arts degree, majoring in History and Politics, as a mature age student.

The epitome of ‘blooming good health’, Nell credits her robust resilience with her life on the farm where she was born.

‘Life was tough. Up at 4.30 on frosty, dark mornings to milk the cows, followed by a walk across several farms to catch a train to school.’

She was still milking cows on the farm well into her 70s. Nell Carr is a credit to her family and the Meander Valley community.

On behalf of those in the Meander Valley and elsewhere who have had the pleasure and privilege to spend time with her, the Meander Valley Gazette would like to say thank you to Nell for her ongoing contribution to the community through all her hard work.