Meander Valley Gazette

Your Independent Community Newspaper

Events

Some of our passionate politicians

EventsJoanne Eisemann

THE GAZETTE asked the following question of those politicians contesting the seat of Lyons or standing for the Senate in Tasmania.

As a candidate in the 2019 Federal Election, what one thing are you most passionate about achieving if elected?

Our mail-out to prospective representatives did not get as many responses as we had hoped. We would like to thank those who took the time to respond, even during a busy campaign.

One response was from a candidate who has since been disendorsed and has stepped back from their candidature. This response has been removed.


web_2019_05_02_Stringer.jpg

Justin Stringer, ACP

I WOULD like to address cost of living and put Australians first again.

Freeze politicians’ pay until the country is back on track, we can also cut some post politician entitlements.

Every decision must be made in the best interest of our country to protect its culture, sovereignty, and economy.

I intend to fight against foreign ownership, commit to farmers instead of foreign aid, discontinue commitments to the UN, leave the Paris agreement and focus on Australian services and infrastructure.

Simplifying the tax system, cutting red & green tape in order to create new jobs and opportunities.

I am a father of two young children, I’m against the safe schools program and any indoctrination of our children.

We want to address power prices, lifting ban on nuclear, actually make use of our resources instead of just shipping them overseas, pay off the national debt and secure our future.


web_2019_05_02_Bilyk.jpg

Catryna Bilyk, ALP

AS A cancer survivor, co-chair of Parliament’s Brain Cancer and Tumour Awareness Group, former chair of the Senate Select Committee into Funding for Research into Cancers with Low Survival Rates and a Cure Brain Cancer Foundation Ambassador, I have been a longstanding advocate for more investment in cancer care and research.

My personal experience with cancer, and my advocacy as a Senator for cancer patients and their families, have given me an appreciation for the physical, financial and emotional struggles that Australians with cancer face.

For this reason I am passionate about seeing the implementation of Labor’s $2.3 billion Medicare Cancer Plan, which will deliver millions of free consultations and scans as well as cheaper medicines for cancer patients. This Plan will dramatically reduce out of pocket costs for cancer patients in Meander Valley, and throughout Australia, so that they can focus on getting well without going broke.


web_2019_05_02_Stephen.jpg

Matthew Stephen, One Nation

IN MY heart you’ll find a rock-hard will to make Tasmania a better place for families. My father, grandfather and great-grandfather were all from Tassie. '

And I’ve had the privilege of growing up with sweet memories of greeting my exhausted Grandad returning home from work at the Paper Mill, watching Grandma serve customers in their Burnie café and picking wild blackberries near Great-Grandma’s home at Round Hill.

I’d like my children to have memories as good as I do – spending time with family growing up in Tassie.

And in order to do that we have to look after our pensioners, workers, families and small business – with policies that will protect them from unfair taxes, while helping them do business, work, thrive and flourish.

I’ve got a good chance of achieving my passion – because I’m part of a team who’s likely to hold the balance of power in Canberra with a strong One Nation Senate voting block.

web_2019_05_02_Mitchell.jpg

Brian Mitchell, ALP

I’M MOST passionate about improving access to services and rebuilding our regional communities.

The number one issue across Lyons is access to healthcare, the second is the rising cost of living.

Decisions by past governments to centralise, automate and cut community services has a lot to do with the issues we face today.

Too many towns have been stripped of state and federal government services in the name of efficiency and the budget bottom line.

Centrelink, Medicare, health workers, police, teachers – the list is endless of service jobs that no longer exist across country Tasmania.

Addressing this is not a matter of turning back the clock, it’s a matter of recognising that communities are healthier when they have local access to services, and that some of the issues our communities face today are a result of them being hollowed out.

So that’s what I’m passionate about. Rebuilding our regions. And that’s what I’ll continue to work hard to achieve.

Swinging dancers, not so square

EventsJoanne Eisemann
The Community Complex was a sea of movement and colour as over 600 square dancers took to the dance floor to strut their stuff.  Photo by Mike Moores

The Community Complex was a sea of movement and colour as over 600 square dancers took to the dance floor to strut their stuff.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Wendy Laing

DELORAINE AND the Valley welcomed the 60th National Square Dancing Convention this month.

Six hundred and thirty-five registered square dancers, ranging in age from 12 years to over 80 years, came from all over Australia for the event, which was held across two venues, the Community Complex and the Bowls Club, from 24–28th April.

‘The Deloraine Community Complex is amazing,’ Coordinator and Caller, Di Ashton from the Launceston Square Dance Club said. ‘We had a great rapport with the Meander Valley Council to help stage the event in Deloraine.’

Square dancing clubs began in Tasmania in 1952 and then went on to join the National body 60 years ago. Usually conducted in capital cities, this was the first time a National Convention had been held in a regional town anywhere in Australia.

Not only were the established square dancers having a wonderful time, but on the Sunday afternoon a public session was held, and anybody interested in learning how to square dance was invited to come along and join in.

During the Convention, the Australian National Association also held well-attended workshops on all aspects of square dancing.

‘The square dances at this Convention are called the mainstream level,’ Di Ashton said. ‘There are 64 moves you need to know by heart. Consistency is the keyword and once learned, you can dance anywhere in the world.’

Weekly classes in modern square dancing have begun in Deloraine and are held on Friday nights from 7.30pm to 10.00pm at the Bowls Club.

Couples, singles and families are welcome to come along and enjoy a fun night of dancing and friendship. For further details contact Gary Petersen on 0499 088 680 or email tassquare@bigpond.com.

Probus celebrating 30 years of fellowship

EventsJoanne Eisemann
Newest Probus member Vicki Downing and Foundation member Joan Loone share a welcome cuppa.  Photo by Mike Moores

Newest Probus member Vicki Downing and Foundation member Joan Loone share a welcome cuppa.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Hayley Manning

THE DELORAINE Ladies Probus Club held an action- packed morning of events in April to celebrate their 30th anniversary and launch a commemorative book of the Club’s history.

Foundation members Vonda Hardy, Helen Greene and Joan Loone, who were present at the inaugural meeting of the Ladies Probus at the Mountain View Motel on 6th April 1989, were given the honour of cutting the cake.

The Rotarians who conducted the meeting all those years ago – Paul Bowman, Athol Smith and Malcolm Taylor (apology) – attended the celebration as special guests, as did former foundation members Beverley Davis and Anne Haines.

Author of The Third Decade, Pauline Grey, thanked Rotary for their establishing support and continued assistance, but said the reason the club had survived for three decades was because of its members. ‘Loyal members who come week after week, year after year,’ she said.

‘I have a theory that if thirty Probus women had been tasked with designing and rolling out the NBN, it would be up and running all over Australia and it would work – all the time!’

Probus began in the 1960s as a social club for retired businessmen in the UK, but under parent body Probus South Pacific Ltd, it has developed into mixed and single gender clubs in 23 countries worldwide.

Over 3000 active members of the Probus family in Tasmania share: ‘Friendship, Fellowship and Fun’ in a social club that gives retired people ‘a new lease of life’ through monthly meetings, knowledgeable guest speakers, local outings and interstate travel.

Pauline thanked Council for a $500 donation towards catering and printing costs and Type It Copy It for printing the book.

Record-smashing pumpkins!

EventsJoanne Eisemann
Winning pumpkin grower Andrew Gleeson enthroned on a heap of giant pumpkins.  Photo by Hayley Manning

Winning pumpkin grower Andrew Gleeson enthroned on a heap of giant pumpkins.

Photo by Hayley Manning

By Hayley Manning

GIANT SMASHING pumpkins of all shapes and sizes were weighed and displayed at the British Hotel Giant Pumpkin Competition in April.

Novice vegetable grower Andrew Gleeson took out first prize with his 57.5 kg pumpkin. ‘I’ve only grown vegetables a few times before,’ he said, ‘so there must be something in the Osmaston soil!’ Andrew was reluctant to share any growing hints besides ‘peeing on the plant at midnight.’

Second place holder with her 38.3kg pumpkin, aptly named B1, Bernie Knipping of Elizabeth Town, said the competition started with a few friends discussing their vegetable-growing prowess and it just grew from there.

Growers and patrons carefully guarded the ever increasing pumpkin patch throughout the afternoon, and a new arrival would have everyone estimating its weight.

Meander resident, Trudi Buttery, came third with her 36kg pumpkin, but it was a close contest with Mole Creek Primary School’s 30.6kg entry.

The competition started in September 2018, when seeds were sold for $20 each. The funds were then pooled for the first prize of $750, second $450 and third of $350, organiser Tom Green said.

‘We really had no idea how many people would support something like this, so the response has been overwhelming with so many taking part. It is such a community- building event we will do it again next year but with a few changes including two seeds for $20, which can be planted anytime after purchase in September,’ he said.

Tom would like to thank the British Hotel Fishing Club for putting on the barbecue, Roberts for lending the scales and everyone who participated.

Preserving your produce with Harvest Keeping

EventsJoanne Eisemann

EVER WONDERED what to do with those extra fruit on your trees and those tomatoes you successfully grew?

Become inspired and learn not to waste our produce. Find out how easy it is to keep our food safely with simple and cheap methods.

Come to the Meander Valley Harvest Keeping and learn the theory and practice of all things preserving, with hands-on experience.

Deloraine House

Wednesday 8th May, 9.00am – 10.30am: The theory behind tried and true preserving techniques

Wednesday 22nd May, 1.00pm – 3.00pm: Water bathing high acid – a practical class

Wednesday 5th June, 1.00pm – 3.00pm: Everything tomato, from passata to dried tomatoes

Westbury Community Health Centre

Tuesday 14th May, 1.00pm – 3.00pm: Water bathing high acid – a practical class

Thursday 30th May, 1.00pm – 3.00pm: Everything tomato, from passata to dried tomatoes

Trade School Deloraine

Tuesday 11th June, 9.00am – 10.30am: Understanding pressure canning

Contact Dinah FitzGerald on 0417 292 622 or westburyhealth@ gmail.com.

Cost $5 .00 per session.

Rosy award prospects for women writers

EventsJoanne Eisemann

THE SOCIETY of Women Writers Tasmania has announced the Rose Frankcombe Short Story Competition for 2019.

The Rose Award is open to all short story writers and is a competition for original short stories written in English that have not previously been published.

The word count is between 1200–1500 words and the theme is ‘Earth’.

First Prize is $200, Second Prize is $50 and there are Highly Commended and Commended Certificates. The closing date for entries is 31 July 2019.

If you are interested in entering, and for more information, please contact Wendy Laing, Competition Coordinator at wendylaing02@gmail.com or go to www.swwtas.org.

High tea and history too!

EventsJoanne Eisemann

HAVE YOU ever driven past the imposing white Georgian building that is Fitzpatrick’s Inn and wondered about the history within?

On Saturday 25th May at 2.30pm, the Anglican Parish of Quamby warmly invites you a special High Tea, where the history of the grand old Inn will be revealed. The property is now for sale, so this may be the last chance for anyone interested in its history to attend.

There will be snippets of the history of High Tea around the world.

Each table will be set with interesting tablecloths with a short description of their ownership on each table.

Included in the charge of $25.00 is a welcome drink, a sumptuous high tea of savoury and sweet delicacies, and door prizes.

All funds raised will go to the Anglican Parish of Quamby Sustainability Fund, vital to keeping the historic churches of the Parish open and available for everyone.

Call Wendy Kilroy on 0413 437 720 for bookings and enquiries. Tickets available in Westbury and Deloraine. RSVP Friday 17th May.

Westbury craick

EventsJoanne Eisemann
Westbury Primary School enjoying traditional maypole dancing in front of an appreciative audience on the Village Green.   Photos | Mike Moores

Westbury Primary School enjoying traditional maypole dancing in front of an appreciative audience on the Village Green.

Photos | Mike Moores

‘The Wheels’, John and Kathy Hickey of Hobart and Lou Barber of Launceston, warm up before their performance on stage.

‘The Wheels’, John and Kathy Hickey of Hobart and Lou Barber of Launceston, warm up before their performance on stage.

April 2019

UNDER THE leafy spread of trees, the Village Green provided a cool, green backdrop for a day of music, dancing and singing at the 2019 St Patrick’s Day Festival. Rehearsing or performing on the stage, or around the maypole, local children and artists from near and far created a pleasant soundtrack for the day’s activities.

Halfway to Forth go all the way in the Little Laneway

EventsJoanne Eisemann
Halfway to Forth band members Dan and Kyle Lizotte will perform their signature blues and roots at the Little Laneway Fringe Festival.   Photo | Sharon Webb

Halfway to Forth band members Dan and Kyle Lizotte will perform their signature blues and roots at the Little Laneway Fringe Festival.

Photo | Sharon Webb

April 2019 | Sharon Webb

TWO HUGE NW Coast bands will lead a line-up of talent from the greater Deloraine area in the Little Laneway Fringe Festival on the weekend starting 26th April. The entertainment in the laneway between the Empire Hotel and Seppenfelts coincides with the national square dancing convention in town on the same weekend – and Seppenfelts’ 10th birthday.

Music kicks off on Friday night from 6.00pm; Halfway to Forth is the big name on Saturday night from 8.00pm - 10.00pm. Band member Dan Lizotte said he and his brother Kyle will perform their signature contemporary folk and roots, with just a shade of blues. “It’s broad roots music with a bit of country sneaking in these days,” he said. “We like to put our spin on old songs but it’s all in the American folk tradition – and an excuse for me to get Kyle playing the slide or banjo.”

The Sheyana Band, which last year won the 2018 Chris Wilson Award for Emerging Act of the Year, perform on from 4 til 5pm followed by a local drumming circle jam. Local musicians will perform alongside the two big bands, giving talented locals without a platform the opportunity to play in public.

Performance organiser Kat Jeffree said performers include Scotty O’Leary, Shani Saint Albans and choir members, Andi (from Deloraine’s Shandi shop), Eddie Tuleja, Sheridan (from the Empire Hotel) and Canadian guitarist Tristan. Janis Chaberka returns to LLFF this year, collaborating with a friend to perform folk music. Poet Yvonne Gluyas will bring eight performance poets from Launceston. Kat Jeffree said classy burlesque dancer Miss Jessie G will once again perform her G-rated five-minute act where she removes her vintage-style outfits – creatively.

“It’s a weekend where musicians come out of the hills and into the town.” “People should drop in any time – it’s a free opportunity to see the creativity our area has to offer,” Kat said.

The Little Laneway Fringe Festival is Friday 26th April, 6.00–10.00pm; Saturday 27th, 1.00–10.00pm; Sunday 28th, 1.00–6.00pm. See FB closer to the event for specific time details.

Revved Up Day at the Creek

EventsJoanne Eisemann
L to R: Ange Weeks and Dee Lowry of Sheffeld testing brand new Harley Davidson Softails which were showcased at Mole Creek.   Photo | Hayley Manning

L to R: Ange Weeks and Dee Lowry of Sheffeld testing brand new Harley Davidson Softails which were showcased at Mole Creek.

Photo | Hayley Manning

March 2019 | Hayley Manning

MUSIC FESTIVAL goers went Radio Ga Ga at Mole Creek on Saturday 23rd February for the 2019 Day at the Creek. The town was a ‘hive’ of activity as a helicopter ferried joy flights overhead, visitors strolled along Pioneer Drive for coffee and the morning papers, and two brand new Harley Davidson Softails arrived to be showcased for the raffle. Mole Creek Hotel owners, Doug and Ramona Westbrook have tapped into Tasmania’s Crazy Little Thing Called Love for tribute bands.

They re-booked Killer Queen Experience to return as headliners after their performance at the 2018 Day at the Creek, along with Credence Clearwater Revival, Bowie and Elvis tribute acts – perfect for those who have not “experienced” the real artists or for people who just want to relive memories from the 70’s and 80’s. Modern-era audiences of all ages can’t get enough of Queen, whose iconic hits are enjoying a world-wide resurgence following the 2018 release of 20th Century Fox’s Bohemian Rhapsody.

The British rock band and lead singer Adam Lambert officially opened the 2019 telecast of the Academy Awards. Chair of Australian Rotary Health Tasmania, John Dare said the hoteliers have always donated to local organisations, but decided for the first time this year they wanted to raffle two identical Harleys, with all funds raised ($45,000) to go to Australian Rotary Health for research into Youth Suicide and Mental Health. Rotary District Governor of Tasmania, Ross Carlyle presented Doug and Ramona with the Paul Harris Fellow recognition at the event for their support. The Harleys were won by Luke McDonald and Woodrow Barstad.

Cats, rats & all take their toll

EventsJoanne Eisemann
A selection of Sarah Lloyd’s bird photographs will be on show at the Meander Valley Council o‚ces in Westbury and Pixels Digital Gallery in Deloraine until the end of March.   Photo | Sarah Lloyd

A selection of Sarah Lloyd’s bird photographs will be on show at the Meander Valley Council o‚ces in Westbury and Pixels Digital Gallery in Deloraine until the end of March.

Photo | Sarah Lloyd

March 2019 | Sarah Lloyd

TASMANIA HAS a special bird fauna, with many species found nowhere else. Some, the Tasmanian Native-hen, the Black Currawong and the largest honeyeater in Australia, the Yellow Wattlebird, are conspicuous. But others are easily overlooked - Scrubtits, Tasmanian Thornbills and Tasmanian Scrubwrens are cryptic birds of wetter habitats; the endemic honeyeaters (Yellow-throated, Strongbilled and Black-headed) forage high in the canopy of eucalypts and rarely descend to the understorey; and the tiny, leaf-sized Forty-spotted Pardalote is now only found in the woodlands of the south and south-east.

In the past two hundred years the Tasmanian landscape has changed irrevocably and there is no doubt that this has been disastrous for birds. Cities and towns are encroaching on bushland; agricultural activities, once restricted to the most fertile soils, are expanding and intensifying and native forests are being decimated to feed our voracious appetite for timber products. A wave of bird declines and extinctions is sweeping the planet and island populations are the most vulnerable.

Their inherently small size, vulnerability to habitat modification, fragmentation and introduced predators, especially cats and rats, and the changing climate are taking their toll. Birds are part of our everyday lives; we are captivated by their antics, beautiful colours and melodious songs.

They have crucial ecological roles in controlling insect populations, pollinating plants and dispersing seeds. Birds have an intrinsic right to exist; we can all play a part in ensuring they do.

A great set of wheels

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | David Claridge

THE DELORAINE Street Car Show gets bigger every year. The number of cars grows and the number of visitors coming through increases, benefitting local businesses and giving people a rare glimpse of motoring history.

For those wanting some extra fun, the show off€ered a Car Cruise and Mystery Garage visit the day before.

Those interested started at the 50’s Diner in Deloraine and then went on a cruise to a surprise garage to see someone’s prized collection.

Committee Member, Carl Mansfield, led the convoy to their mystery destination, a di€fferent one each year.

“There were one hundred cars on the cruise this year. The line went for kilometres as we made the journey,” he said.

“Many people come from Hobart and the mainland, so we have this to give them. It’s something else to see while they’re here.”

An estimated 500 cars were on display at the car show this year, and they were met with perfect weather.

Funds raised by the event are put back into the community through various organisations.

“We will give more away during the year when we decide where it’s needed the most,” Mr Mansfield said.

The Deloraine Car Show was an idea of a group of local businessmen including Carl, who wanted to bring business to Deloraine.

A magnificent muscle car visits Deloraine for the annual Deloraine Street Car Show.   Photo | Custom Street & Muscle Tasmania

A magnificent muscle car visits Deloraine for the annual Deloraine Street Car Show.

Photo | Custom Street & Muscle Tasmania

Breathing, laughing, living

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Hayley Manning

TO MOST people, yoga conjures up visions of chanting, sweaty bodies and limbs contorted into poses such as Downward Facing Dog, Reclined Cow Face and, of course, the Eight-point Shoulder Opener.

However, laughter yoga bears no resemblance to traditional yoga besides shared health benefits and a Hindu form of cultural greeting and/or parting from Sanskrit known as Namaste: “I bow to the divine in you”.

Attuned Vitality owner, Debby Kemsley describes her Laughter Yoga Club as “exercise for the soul” – designed to drive the stale air from your lungs, while creating a favourable environment for the happy, feel-good hormones - endorphins. Each 30 minute session features alternating sequences of laughter and breathing exercises, repeated over five rounds, followed by a pause at the end of each sequence.

“Laughing can increase the body’s endorphin levels to create a more positive attitude and generate a lot of energy. It can also lower the stress hormone cortisol, which can make people feel tired and unenergetic, without them even realising why,” Debby said.

Laughter Yoga Club will be at Deloraine House starting on 13th March, Wednesdays 9.00am for a 9.15am start. It’s free. Private and extra sessions also available. Contact Debby Kemsley: 0477 772 739.

From L-R Brenda Greichen, Debby Kemsley and Jilli Porter-Bains, all practice laughing yoga on a regular basis.   Photo | Mike Moores

From L-R Brenda Greichen, Debby Kemsley and Jilli Porter-Bains, all practice laughing yoga on a regular basis.

Photo | Mike Moores

Heritage celebrated through St Patrick’s day festival

EventsJoanne Eisemann
The Westbury St Patrick’s Day Festival will be held on the Village Green Saturday 16th March from 10.00am, entry by donation.   Photo | Mike Moores

The Westbury St Patrick’s Day Festival will be held on the Village Green Saturday 16th March from 10.00am, entry by donation.

Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019 | David Claridge

WESTBURY WILL be green in March with a family festival to coincide with Saint Patricks Day. After last year’s festival was cancelled due to planning problems, the committee has made sure 2019 will go ahead on the 16th March.

Secretary Amanda Taylor expressed how the annual festival comes about to celebrate Westbury’s Irish heritage. “We want it to be a family friendly festival. There will be local performers as we celebrate Westbury’s history. “It was settled by many Irish immigrants and convicts such as Richard Dry”, she said. Westbury in the 1820s was a garrison village.

The first settlers were mainly Irish ex-convicts, retired soldiers and free settlers. By 1850 it was the largest military community in Tasmania. Richard Dry was the largest landowner in Westbury. An ex-convict through political exile, he helped many Irish people set up in Westbury. His son became the first nativeborn Premier of Tasmania.

From the events Facebook Page: There will be a street parade at 10.ooam along with performers and food and craft stalls, a church market, vintage tractors and children’s activities. As previously published in Meander Valley Gazette, “The event’s new steering group is working hard to recreate a village festival that celebrates Westbury’s Irish heritage with an emphasis on folk tradition and rural activities.”

The festival will be at the Westbury Village Green from 10.00am - 4.00pm. Entry will be by donation.

A century of service

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Wendy Laing

A WEEKLY hospital visit is only one of the many activities members have undertaken over many years as volunteers with the Deloraine Branch of the Australian Red Cross. 100 people attended the annual fund raiser, a Devonshire Tea and raffle, held on the 31st January this year.

This raised $2,279, which President Lexie Young said would go towards charities throughout Tasmania, including bush fire relief. During the event, two members were honoured for their long service to the Red Cross.

The Northern Regional manager, Barbra Hill and the volunteer mobilisation coordinator Pippa French presented Joan Pedley with a gilt rosette for 60 years of service and Marilyn Day received an award for 50 years of service. A remarkable achievement.

Over the years, Joan Pedley and Marilyn Day along with all the members of the Deloraine Red Cross have raised money by working at fairs, door knocking and through the TeleCross program which was set up to help people who live alone and are at risk of an accident or illness that may go unnoticed. In particular, people who are housebound or may have a disability

L to R: Joan Pedley, Marilyn Day and Lexie Young of Deloraine Red Cross.   Photo | Mike Moores

L to R: Joan Pedley, Marilyn Day and Lexie Young of Deloraine Red Cross.

Photo | Mike Moores

Compassionate nation

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019

A NEW Red Cross survey reveals Australians are compassionate, with around two thirds (64%) of the population wanting to do more to help people in need. Kerry McGrath, Director Community Programs, Australian Red Cross said: “In the second year of our Red Cross survey, Australia is trending in a very positive direction, with the great majority of us wanting to help others, and even an 8 percent increase from last year.”

“Young people top the country, with eight of ten (82%) aged 16-17 saying they want to help others doing it tough. This is excellent news for the state of our communities, now and into the future.” “Australians are absolutely crying out to make a contribution, with more than one in two (56%) saying they genuinely want to do more locally, yet just over a third (38%) say they are actively connected and engaged.”

The new research coincides with thousands of volunteers hitting the streets for March’s Red Cross Calling Appeal. Every March, Red Cross Calling brings volunteers together to host events, knock on doors or donate to Red Cross Calling.

Any language anywhere

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019

EVER WANTED to learn a language? All you need is your library card.

Come along to the Deloraine Online Access Centre on Tuesday 26th March at 10.00am to 11.30am and discover how your library card provides access to Mango Languages and the opportunity to learn 70+ languages.

It’s great for travellers, business people or for anyone who loves learning new things. Who knows, you might be able to watch those foreign without the subtitles!

Participants can come, hear and look or they can use a computer and enrol. Bring your current Libraries Tasmania card & password (if you haven’t used your Library card in awhile, drop into the Library to update it & your password) and also bring an email address you can access at the centre.

This session is provided free of charge and morning tea will be provided, but please book a spot first by calling the Online Centre on 6362 3537.

MVG.jpg

Travel to Ulverstone

EventsJoanne Eisemann

March 2019 | Over the fence

A COUPLE of events coming up in Ulverstone may be of interest to residents of Meander Valley. The first is a Mental Health and WellBeing Workshop for people 65+. Participants will be presented with the latest Australian and Tasmanian research finding on what is known to be important and meaningful to people, especially Tasmania.

Local priorities will be identified and local opportunities explored. Free workshop  9:30am through to 2:30pm. Catering is provided. Register at www.eventbrite. com/e/people-65-mental-health-wellbeing-workshop-tickets-53943495447 or call Roslyn Evenett 6421 3618 for more information.

The second is Back to the Future. Ulverstone’s North West Ecofest is being held on April 13th, 2019 – 10.00am to 4.00pm. The theme is Back to the Future: where the Wisdom of the past meets the innovation of the future. Entry to the festival is by gold coin donation. The festival offers an opportunity to engage with some local community groups, businesses and individuals who are willing to share expertise in the areas of sustainability, wellbeing and the environment.

Stalls, workshops and talks as well as food, buskers and children’s activities will complete the experience. Special guest is Tasmania’s very own “Food Guru” and Senior Citizen of the Year, Sally Wise. Bring your old batteries, mobiles, spectacles to be recycled. Cycle, walk, car share and don’t forget your own water bottle. Contact Anne 0407 614 985.