Meander Valley Gazette

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People and Places

No time for a boring life – Terry Roles

Community, People and PlacesJoanne Eisemann
Terry Roles – no regrets and no time to lead a boring life.  Photo by Mike Moores

Terry Roles – no regrets and no time to lead a boring life.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Wendy Laing

TERRY ROLES has never found the time to lead a boring life. The youngest of eight children, he was born and raised in Deloraine.

As a child, he always wanted a horse and would ride around on a broomstick, pretending to be a jockey.

However, his first job after leaving school was at the Deloraine Savings Bank of Tasmania, but every weekend was spent at the pony club riding or training horses.

Terry left the bank after five years and accepted the position of a stable foreman with Alan Stubbs at Osmaston. At the age of 23 he received his first licence as a horse trainer.

Terry started training racehorses for flat racing but with a passion for jump racing this became his focus both locally and interstate. Over the years, he had many prestigious wins, including five Grand National steeple chases at Deloraine, where this record still stands today.

His favourite horse, Inchgower, won 19 races. He started as a galloper, turned to hurdles and continued on to become a successful showjumper. ‘Inchgower, nicknamed Jimbob, became a well-loved member of our family,’ Terry said, ‘and was the first horse my daughter, Erin rode after a life-threatening fall in 2006.’

Erin’s accident triggered a change in direction for Terry Roles. He decided to resign from his job as a horse trainer and began work as a cleaner, then a carer at Grenoch Home Aged Care in Deloraine. Six years ago, Terry obtained a Diploma of Nursing. He now holds a management position at the Kanangra Aged Care Hostel in Deloraine and finds it very rewarding.

Although Terry still loves to follow and watch horse racing, he has no regrets about leaving his career as a horse trainer where he had received several serious injuries, including fracturing his neck. ‘Over the years, I met many amazing people in the industry who are still loyal friends,’ he said.

Terry has always had a fascination with mountains. In March this year, after being diagnosed with motor neurone disease, Terry, along with friends and his daughter Sophie climbed Quamby Bluff for the first time. ‘Reaching the top, I gazed around at the fantastic views while drinking a can of Guinness,’ he said.

Terry continues in his role at the Deloraine football club as a trainer and manages players’ injuries. ‘Both my father and uncle were trainers at the club,’ he said.

During Terry’s 34 years as a registered horse trainer, he had over 600 career wins, earning prize money of over one hundred and fifty million dollars.

Deloraine Parish proposes homes for Saleyards land

People and PlacesJoanne Eisemann
web_2019_08_08_church_villas_01.jpg
Architectural renderings of the proposed Saleyards development.  Images supplied

Architectural renderings of the proposed Saleyards development.

Images supplied

By Sharon Webb

THE ANGLICAN Parish of Deloraine plans to build eight villas on land adjacent to St Mark’s Church to cover its funding obligation to the National Redress Scheme for children sexually abused in institutions.

St Mark’s minister, Reverend Joshua Skeat, said the land on East Westbury Place in Deloraine, historically known as the Saleyards, and St Saviour’s Church in Meander originally had been listed for sale by Tasmania’s Anglican Diocese to cover the parish’s obligation.

‘There has always been a desire in the parish to utilize the land rather than simply selling it,’ he said.

‘The church wardens and the parish council also wanted to talk with the Meander community about the use of their church building, which hasn’t been used for services since April 2017,’ he said.

‘We paid the redress money out of parish funds, giving us time to make decisions.’ While discussions with the Meander community are ongoing, the parish council decided to take advantage of an offer by developers, Traders in Purple, to help develop the Saleyards land.

‘We want to sell six villas and keep two to solidify parish finances,’ Reverend Skeat said. ‘The money raised will replace the parish funds used for redress and St Mark’s Church needs repair.

‘Local real estate agents advised us that two-bedroom units are in demand to buy and rent in Deloraine. We’d like to rent out the two villas we keep, pricing them at the lower end of the rental market to give families and couples affordable, secure accommodation in a desirable location.

’ Traders in Purple, the company behind Ridgeside Lane in Evandale and Kingston Park in Kingston, worked with the parish to lodge a planning application with Meander Valley Council.

Director Charles Daoud said that while supporting redress for people who experienced institutional abuse is important, retaining significant places like St Saviour’s was also important.

‘If there are ways of achieving both they should be explored,’ he said. ‘The history of St Saviour’s is one reason Traders in Purple reached out to help the Deloraine Parish and the Meander community.

‘It was designed by the local architect H.H. Freeman, who also designed Deloraine’s historic home, Arcoona. It was built in 1896 by Exton contractors Reilly’s for £140 and the altar donated by wardens of All Saints in Hobart.

‘There is also a significant burial ground on St Saviour’s grounds. Hopefully this now means its preservation is guaranteed.’

Mr Daoud said the project is sensitive to its surroundings and sense of place and will not visually impact St Mark’s Church. ‘The proposal respects the significant historic value to the point that the single-storey villas have been designed to retain important view corridors to the church.’

The Vicar-General of the Anglican Diocese of Tasmania, The Right Reverend Dr Chris Jones, said he appreciates that if the application is approved St Saviour’s Church will not need to be sold but will remain a community asset.

‘I commend the parish for its creative response,’ he said. ‘I am also greatly encouraged the parish is seeking to be a blessing to its community by providing low income housing in Deloraine.’

Traders in Purple, along with Rytenskild Traffic Engineering, MRC Engineering, Lange Design, Michael Jirku Architecture and PDA Surveyors, are working pro bono to deliver the project.

If approved, work will begin in early 2020, estimated to complete in November 2020. St Mark’s Church plans to build eight units to contribute to the National Redress Scheme for children sexually abused in institutions.

A life of giving to others

Community, People and PlacesJoanne Eisemann
Kim Brundle-Lawrence of Carrick  Photo by Mike Moores

Kim Brundle-Lawrence of Carrick

Photo by Mike Moores

By David Claridge

HELPING THE community is something that has come naturally for Carrick lady Kim Brundle-Lawrence.

Ever since learning first aid from the Red Cross in grade 4 at school, Kim started on a path of volunteering which has resulted in 54 years with the Red Cross, 45 years with the Tasmanian Bands League (the majority of that time with the City of Launceston RSL Band) and nearly 30 years with the Tasmania Fire Service to name a few.

Kim is also President of Lifelink Samaritans.

Her roles have ranged from door knocking for the Red Cross March Appeal to helping with disaster relief in Tasmania and on the mainland.

In the Queen’s Birthday Honours, Kim was recognised for her many years of services to the community with the Order of Australia Medal.

‘People ask me how I prioritise … I ask myself who needs me more. Once I took my Red Cross bag in the back of a fire truck due to a town potentially being evacuated,’ she said.

‘It’s getting out there and helping people. I don’t have many ties at home now, so it keeps me busy.

‘While the award is really nice for me and I’m stoked about it, I see it as recognition of not only me doing work but for all volunteers doing work. It’s an acknowledgement to all of us.

‘I wouldn’t be able to do this without the support from the families I have across the various groups.’

Kim was awarded Honorary Life Member of the Red Cross in December 2018, which sits with the many other accolades she has collected over the years.

Kim Brundle-Lawrence has received the Order of Australia Medal in the Queen’s Birthday Honours for her many years of services to the community.

OneCare near the oceanside, Rubicon Grove

Community, People and PlacesJoanne Eisemann

By Wendy Laing

RUBICON GROVE is a residential aged-care facility situated at Port Sorell and was first opened in 2009. Since then it has grown not only in size but also the ability to provide low, high and palliative care on both a respite and residential basis.

After a $5.6 million redevelopment earlier this year, amongst other renovations and refurbishments, Rubicon Grove now boasts a state-of-the-art kitchen area, a community centre and, Rubi’s Tea House.

Each of the single residential rooms has a private ensuite and an internal courtyard. There is a cosy lounge in each of the four residential wings with tea and coffee making facilities, where residents can relax or entertain family and friends.

A life-style manager coordinates over fifty volunteers, who spend one-to-one time with residents and help with a range of undertakings, including driving the community bus, gardening, shopping expeditions and craft activities.

The new community centre is an integral part of Rubicon Grove, not only for residents but also as a hub for various neighbourhood events, meetings and activities.

Round the clock nursing care is always available to residents who need assistance, including medication, exercise and dietary requirements.

OneCare’s Rubicon Grove nursing home is at 89 Club Drive, Port Sorrell, within walking distance of the Shearwater shopping precinct.

For further information visit their website www. agedcareguide.com.au/onecares- rubicon-grove or phone (03) 6427 5700.

Rubicon Grove facilities include a cafe for residents and guests.  Photo supplied

Rubicon Grove facilities include a cafe for residents and guests.

Photo supplied

A tall ship to Antarctica

Feature, People and PlacesJoanne Eisemann
Chris Grose of Blackstone Heights recently returned from a voyage to Antarctica on the three-masted  Bark Europa . Chris is sharing his story and photos with the Gazette this month. Drop in to see the full exhibition at Pixels Gallery at the Deloraine Online Centre. The gallery will be showcasing Chris’s photos for the months of June and July.

Chris Grose of Blackstone Heights recently returned from a voyage to Antarctica on the three-masted Bark Europa. Chris is sharing his story and photos with the Gazette this month. Drop in to see the full exhibition at Pixels Gallery at the Deloraine Online Centre. The gallery will be showcasing Chris’s photos for the months of June and July.

Story and photos by Chris Grose

SAILING TO ANTARCTICA aboard a 40m three-masted steel sailing bark may not be everyone’s holiday of choice but for me it was the only way to go. And so I found myself at the helm of Bark Europa as we ploughed through 5m seas and a 50 knot gale heading across the Drake Passage, the notoriously rough stretch of water where the Pacific meets the Atlantic ocean at the tip of South America.

For the first 24 hours of the crossing most of the voyage crew had succumbed to seasickness and rarely moved from our bunks. ‘Sounds like world war three down here,’ I overheard one experienced crew member say, amidst the moaning and groaning, as I lay hunched over my little yellow bucket.

As we found our sea legs, more and more of us could be found on deck, taking the helm or standing watch as the ship rolled beneath us and the wind howled through the rigging. Meal times became a social occasion rather than something to be endured. After four days of sailing we reached the South Shetland Islands and made our first landfall at Yankee Harbour and were greeted by the soon-to-be familiar aroma of penguin guano.

Going ashore in the zodiacs we were left to wander the pebbly beaches, observing hundreds of gentoo penguins, skuas, fur seals and occasional elephant seals, none of whom appeared in the least perturbed to see us.

Over the following two weeks we had numerous shore landings and zodiac cruises amongst the icebergs. At Walkers Bay on Livingstone Island we climbed an old glacial moraine and looked down upon a tremendous glacier descending from the island’s heart until it reached the sea where it ended in great ice cliffs. Even from our airy lookout we could hear the thunder as great lumps of ice calved off and plunged into the sea.

At Deception Island we visited the remains of an old whaling station and marvelled at steam rising from the beaches where sea water was being heated by thermal activity – the island is itself a dormant volcano!

At every landing site there were gentoo, chinstrap or adelie penguins to greet us. We saw more elephant, weddell and leopard seals. Rising early one morning I climbed the rigging of the main mast and looked out at dramatic mountains and glaciers and a sea that reflected the sapphire blue sky overhead.

Everywhere I turned, both near and far, there were spouts from humpback whales – several passed within 50m of Europa. Most memorable of all were the deep blue shadows hidden inside the many icebergs that we passed.

All too soon it was time to head back across the Drake – but this time few succumbed to sea sickness. As we passed by a distant Cape Horn, thoughts turned to home and those that we had left behind. How could we best explain what dramatic landscapes and marvellous wildlife we had experienced?

I knew the question everyone would ask. ‘What was it like?’ could not be answered with mere words.

My lasting impression of Antarctica is one of just how fragile it is and how important it is that we all look after and protect it in every way we can.

Europa  appears dwarfed by the landscape as the voyage crew take ahike at Orne Harbor to visit a chinstrap penguin colony.

Europa appears dwarfed by the landscape as the voyage crew take ahike at Orne Harbor to visit a chinstrap penguin colony.

Sunrise in the Gerlache Strait. I rose early on this particular morning and watched numerous humpback whales feeding around the ship.

Sunrise in the Gerlache Strait. I rose early on this particular morning and watched numerous humpback whales feeding around the ship.

A Gentoo penguin, one of three types of penguin that we saw during the trip, appears to fly above the water.

A Gentoo penguin, one of three types of penguin that we saw during the trip, appears to fly above the water.

Approaching the Lemaire Channel, also known as ‘Kodak Gap’ due to the spectacular mountain and glacier scenery.

Approaching the Lemaire Channel, also known as ‘Kodak Gap’ due to the spectacular mountain and glacier scenery.