Meander Valley Gazette

Your Independent Community Newspaper

Westbury

Westbury Prison already locked in?

News, People and Places, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
Photo by Mike Moores  Meander Valley Mayor Wayne Johnston, Corrections Minister Elise Archer and John Tucker, Liberal Member for Lyons, announce the proposed site of the new Northern Regional Prison, at the Westbury Industrial Precinct, just over the Bass Highway from the historic Westbury township.

Photo by Mike Moores

Meander Valley Mayor Wayne Johnston, Corrections Minister Elise Archer and John Tucker, Liberal Member for Lyons, announce the proposed site of the new Northern Regional Prison, at the Westbury Industrial Precinct, just over the Bass Highway from the historic Westbury township.

Image supplied  Visualisation of the new Northern Regional Prison the state government plans to build on the outskirts of Westbury, at 135 Birralee Road.

Image supplied

Visualisation of the new Northern Regional Prison the state government plans to build on the outskirts of Westbury, at 135 Birralee Road.

By Sharon Webb

THE TASMANIAN Government’s announcement of Westbury as the proposed site for a new $270m prison is already taking a toll among residents and local councillors.

Residents are lobbying councillors to protest about the stigma of Westbury becoming a prison town.

And Meander Valley Council Mayor Wayne Johnston was clearly affected on ABC Radio in a discussion about online trolling of councillors. He advised listeners to take up their problems with the prison with the state government not the council.

Councillor John Temple said around six residents a day drop into his Westbury gallery to vent their opinions.

‘People are very much against the proposal,’ he said.

‘They are aware of the social changes it may bring to this community and the nature of the area. It’s also a fear of the unknown.

‘We knew we may get a prison co-located with Ashley and were imagining a smaller prison. We had no thoughts of maximum security.’

Minister for Corrections Elise Archer last week announced that the site for the 270-bed prison would be on the outskirts of the historic village of Westbury, on the property at 135 Birralee Road.

Currently Glen Avon Farms, a 401 hectare site whose owners are located in the UK, the property is now used by a sister company Selborne Biological to produce animal blood products.

Ms Archer said the site was chosen from ten expressions of interest by landowners but would not comment on the other nine locations.

The government has negotiated a conditional contract on 41 hectares of Glen Avon Farms’ land. The prison’s footprint will be 13 hectares.

Advance preparation for the announcement was obvious, with roll-up banners printed for the announcement press conference, flyers dropped in Westbury letterboxes within 48 hours and an information website made available.

Acting Meander Valley Council general manager Jonathan Harmey said the next step is for the State Government to apply to council to rezone the land.

The project will be advertised and the public can make submissions in support or against it. The final decision is made by the Tasmanian Planning Commission.

Ms Archer, along with the website and flyers, emphasised the positive outcomes of the project as jobs for people in the area. ‘Hundreds of jobs during construction over five and ten year phases and 250 people employed permanently once in full operation.’

She was echoed by Meander Valley councillor Andrew Sherriff. ‘It’s a spend of $270m in this municipality – how can it not be a good thing?

‘The prison has got to go somewhere. I’d be more than happy to have it in Deloraine where I live. We have Ashley Detention Centre here – is that a big problem?’

Commenting on recent prison break-outs Cllr Sherriff maintained, that unlike the ageing Risdon prison, the new Northern Regional Prison would be a state-of-the-art high security prison: ‘I don’t know how you’d scale a six metre concrete wall.’

Cllr Frank Nott said, ‘This is a social justice advantage for prisoners from north and north-west Tasmania to have more access to their families.

‘The disadvantage is that noone wants it in their backyard. There’s a stigma attached to suburbs like Risdon Vale.’

Westbury factory supporting salmon industry

FeatureJoanne Eisemann
CEO David Lord, (orange vest), manager Johnny Cabercas (far left) and some of the local workers now employed by Ridley at Westbury.  Photo by Mike Moores

CEO David Lord, (orange vest), manager Johnny Cabercas (far left) and some of the local workers now employed by Ridley at Westbury.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Sharon Webb

A $50M factory manufacturing food for Tasmania’s salmon farming industry has opened officially at Westbury’s industrial zone, Valley Central.

Australian manufacturer of farm animal and pet food, Ridley currently supplies Petuna and Tassal with salmon food, as well as NZ customers.

Ridley’s CEO, David Lord, said the plant currently employs 20 locals: commissioning had been smooth although managers are still fine-tuning.

‘With this world-class technology we are able to produce 50 000 tonnes a year on a five day shift structure,’ he said. ‘Our intention is to have the capacity to go to round the clock, seven day shifts if warranted.’ Westbury factory supporting salmon industry

‘We have relationships with all major salmon producers and now we have made this commitment to be their local Tasmanian supplier, we are looking forward to their support.’

Launching the plant, Premier Will Hodgman said it is expected to inject about $21 million a year into the local economy.

‘Ridley’s new facility is also strategically important for our salmon industry, increasing the supply of locally sourced, high quality feed product to meet projected industry growth,’ he said.

‘The aquaculture sector is a significant contributor to the Tasmanian economy and to support growth and protect our position, the industry must remain competitive in all aspects of the supply chain.’

Ridley uses extrusion technology to produce salmon food and can also produce dry pet food, Mr Lord said.

The ingredients are high quality and locally sourced as much as possible.

Plant construction involved 350 project managers, contractors and sub-contractors across 40 companies, of which 90 percent were Tasmanian.

In approving the plant, Tasmania’s EPA acknowledged the problem of odour emissions 15 times the allowable levels at the plant boundaries, indicated by Ridley’s own testing.

It stipulated Ridley must submit quarterly air testing results in its first operating year and twice a year after that, keep a complaints register and notify the authority of complaints within 24 hours

A dog day out on the Village Green!

EventsJoanne Eisemann

NEW OCTOBER event, Paws on the Green is a fund raising day organised by Westbury Health Inc., with proceeds going to Let’s Read, the Smith Family early literacy program.

Pet-related organisations, food vendors, and anyone else who would be interested in joining them on the day are asked to get in touch.

The day will host dog races, dog jumping and other contests, training demonstrations and novelty events such as a grand parade with prizes.

There will be food, music and entertainment with free entry (donation collection) throughout the day.

St Andrews on the Green will host the Blessing of the Animals and Westbury Market on the same day.

Contact Paws at pawsonthegreen19@gmailcom or find us on Facebook at Paws on the Green, Westbury.

Blooming marvellous!

Community, FeatureJoanne Eisemann
From left, Wendy and Roger Travis along with Helen Clarke, President of Westbury Garden Club, planting bulbs outside the White House in King Street, opposite the Village Green, Westbury.  Photo by Mike Moores

From left, Wendy and Roger Travis along with Helen Clarke, President of Westbury Garden Club, planting bulbs outside the White House in King Street, opposite the Village Green, Westbury.

Photo by Mike Moores

THE WESTBURY Garden Club has coordinated the planting of over 3,000 bulbs in May, at the eastern entrance to the town and beneath more than 200 street trees.

The Garden Club contributed $1000 for the purchase of bulbs, in addition to the many that were donated by the community.

A $3000 grant from Meander Valley Council and the involvement of the Council’s Works Department allowed the project to be expanded, complementing Council’s street tree plantings.

With donations and help from throughout the Westbury community, the bulbs will create an annual display that can only enhance Westbury’s considerable street appeal.

Once upon a time …

Arts and Reviews, BusinessJoanne Eisemann
Eve Robson surrounded by a lifetime of collectables.  Photo by Mike Moores

Eve Robson surrounded by a lifetime of collectables.

Photo by Mike Moores

By Wai Lin Coultas

ONCE UPON A Time Collectables opened last July at 49 William Street.

Eve and Ian Robson have collected while living in Sydney and on vacations around Australia. Along with all sorts of rustic items and furniture, their collectables include 1900s English china, Venetian and Victorian glassware, English and Australian pottery.

Be it old irons or even scales, Eve loves rustics as people can buy them to display or use.

When she and Ian collected too much china, pottery and glass to fit in their house, they started selling at Sydney markets as a hobby.

When the markets slowed down for china and glass, they switched to rustics – old luggage, mirrors, ladders.

They have been sourcing for quite a number of customers since opening their shop. ‘If we come across it, I will let them know,’ Eve added.

After six vacations every two years, Eve and Ian settled in Tasmania eighteen months ago. They always visited Westbury as it was ‘quiet and easy going compared to the city … the people are very helpful, friendly and nice.’

To go with their William Street shop, they bought tables and sideboards from Love Antiques. ‘We had the stock to start a shop up. What we did not have were the big pieces of furniture to put things on,’ Eve explained.

Tasmanians are becoming regular customers by word of mouth. Even people from Hobart drive over and tourists visiting by ferry happily load their cars up too.

Reminiscing often prompts purchases, Eve elaborated. ‘They see things they have had when they were younger. Or remember one of their parents having them …’

Half the Robson’s sales have been small traditional furniture: tables; occasional tables; little cabinets for kitchens or bathrooms. Men favour old rustic midget toys, cast iron pieces and tools.

The shop gives Ian the space to strip back, wax and replace parts to let the true worth of collected pieces shine – something he got interested in since Eve started collecting.

With their shop open only from Fridays to Sundays, it has enabled them to slow down, while still having a hobby.

‘Tassie is a hidden treasure with everything – the lovely oceans, mountain ranges, rivers, and a little city life in Lonnie and Hobart. We have no plans to go back to the mainland, except visit family.’

Mending the rift

NewsJoanne Eisemann

THE TASMANIAN Catholic Diocese has removed Father Nicholas Rynne from his position at the Deloraine and Westbury churches after an outcry from parishioners.

But after an incident on his final Saturday in the job, police have charged three parishioners with common assault.

Tasmania Police say they were called to attend a minor disturbance at Deloraine’s Holy Redeemer Catholic Church at 6:50pm on 30th March.

Father Rynne and a 77-year-old Deloraine woman were allegedly pushed and grabbed by three other people during a minor altercation. No one was injured.

A 76-year-old woman and a 75-year-old man, both from Elizabeth Town, were charged with common assault via summons and will appear in the Launceston Magistrates Court.

The Catholic Diocese has confirmed Father Rynne has ceased work in the Meander Valley parish and is on leave.

It was also confirmed that the Dean of the North, Father Mark Freeman, has agreed to act as a moderator of the parish for the immediate future.

Provision of masses for the community in the coming weeks has been arranged

Flowers and veg come full circle in Westbury

FeatureJoanne Eisemann
March 2019   The Westbury Garden Club Flower Show was once again a runaway success, attracting an estimated 700 entries. 300 people attended on the day with Lorraine Pasfield and R Mercer taking out the prize for Grand Champion Dahlia. As well as the many beautiful blooms on show there was also a selection of summer vegetables, including this unusually shaped marrow, held by Elena Tweedale 8 yrs of Westbury.   Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019

The Westbury Garden Club Flower Show was once again a runaway success, attracting an estimated 700 entries. 300 people attended on the day with Lorraine Pasfield and R Mercer taking out the prize for Grand Champion Dahlia. As well as the many beautiful blooms on show there was also a selection of summer vegetables, including this unusually shaped marrow, held by Elena Tweedale 8 yrs of Westbury.

Photo | Mike Moores

Cattlemen strut their stuff

SportJoanne Eisemann
Geo Harvey riding Tanbark Redpa of Westbury competing in the Roy Davies Memorial Stockman’s Whip Crack at the Harveydale gathering of the Mountain Cattlemen’s Association. The competition involves hitting 10 targets with your whip in a horse shoe design. Pictured below: Ruby Geach 12yrs with brother Lenny 6yrs compete in the junior whip cracking.   Photo | Mike Moores

Geo Harvey riding Tanbark Redpa of Westbury competing in the Roy Davies Memorial Stockman’s Whip Crack at the Harveydale gathering of the Mountain Cattlemen’s Association. The competition involves hitting 10 targets with your whip in a horse shoe design. Pictured below: Ruby Geach 12yrs with brother Lenny 6yrs compete in the junior whip cracking.

Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019 | David Claridge

WESTBURY GOT a country jolt in February with horses and stock whips gathering for some fierce competition. The annual Mountain Cattlemen’s event landed at Harveydale this year with hundreds of people coming to compete and watch.

Longford man Will Browning took home the Senior Championship, Victorian man Peter Hodgkin took second, while Sassafras local Ben Howe took third place. In the junior division, first, second and third were Westbury girls, Maya Scott, Georgia Burford-Rowe and Georgia Elias. TMCA Secretary Danza Hardwicke shared how gate takings were on par with previous years.

“There were a lot more day passes sold this year with the event being close to a town. We even had a couple of mainland competitors. “We have a championship of four stages, whip crack, handy stockhorse, cattle handling and an optimum time stock horse race. The competition was high, so it was a good event.

“This year we trialled an U12 event which got 14 children involved. 2019 was the 32nd  meet which moves around the state each year. The association, from their website, states that they actively try to pass down traditional stockman’s skills and are trying to protect high country heritage and traditions.

Heritage celebrated through St Patrick’s day festival

EventsJoanne Eisemann
The Westbury St Patrick’s Day Festival will be held on the Village Green Saturday 16th March from 10.00am, entry by donation.   Photo | Mike Moores

The Westbury St Patrick’s Day Festival will be held on the Village Green Saturday 16th March from 10.00am, entry by donation.

Photo | Mike Moores

March 2019 | David Claridge

WESTBURY WILL be green in March with a family festival to coincide with Saint Patricks Day. After last year’s festival was cancelled due to planning problems, the committee has made sure 2019 will go ahead on the 16th March.

Secretary Amanda Taylor expressed how the annual festival comes about to celebrate Westbury’s Irish heritage. “We want it to be a family friendly festival. There will be local performers as we celebrate Westbury’s history. “It was settled by many Irish immigrants and convicts such as Richard Dry”, she said. Westbury in the 1820s was a garrison village.

The first settlers were mainly Irish ex-convicts, retired soldiers and free settlers. By 1850 it was the largest military community in Tasmania. Richard Dry was the largest landowner in Westbury. An ex-convict through political exile, he helped many Irish people set up in Westbury. His son became the first nativeborn Premier of Tasmania.

From the events Facebook Page: There will be a street parade at 10.ooam along with performers and food and craft stalls, a church market, vintage tractors and children’s activities. As previously published in Meander Valley Gazette, “The event’s new steering group is working hard to recreate a village festival that celebrates Westbury’s Irish heritage with an emphasis on folk tradition and rural activities.”

The festival will be at the Westbury Village Green from 10.00am - 4.00pm. Entry will be by donation.

Bonza brekkies & fair dinkum fun

FeatureJoanne Eisemann

February 2019

WHEN IT comes to Australia Day Breakfasts, Chudleigh certainly brings home the bacon.

With visitors from Melbourne and locals from as far away as Longford, the stalwart volunteers were kept on their toes ferrying huge amounts of tucker for the seemingly endless line of eager and hungry visitors.

At Westbury the old hands set to with a will, up to their elbows in bangers and mushroom.

The previous evening in Prospect Vale saw a few hiccups for Council’s Australia Day Award Ceremonies.

At one stage it seemed unlikely that the event would go ahead when the Highlands fire emergency caused a blackout to Prospect Vale and surrounding suburbs.

Then Councillor Tanya King very bravely sang the national anthem (with some help from the Meander Men) when the scheduled performer didn’t turn up.

Things went smoothly from then on with many wonderful Meander Valleyites being recognised for their extraordinary service to community.

Woody Sampson and daughter Faith recent arrivals from Melbourne enjoy brekky at Chudleigh   Photo | Mike Moores

Woody Sampson and daughter Faith recent arrivals from Melbourne enjoy brekky at Chudleigh

Photo | Mike Moores

From L-R: Sue Poulton, Alison Lee and Dinah Fitzgerald feed the hungry hoards at Westbury.   Photo | Mike Moores

From L-R: Sue Poulton, Alison Lee and Dinah Fitzgerald feed the hungry hoards at Westbury.

Photo | Mike Moores

‘Alkaloids’ expand palliative possibilities

BusinessJoanne Eisemann

Feburary 2019 | Sharon Webb

A TASMANIAN Alkaloids employee has confirmed the company is growing cannabis for medical use on its site at Westbury. The company’s director of agricultural research Les Baxter told Deloraine Rotary Club’s January meeting that the plants are grown indoors under Australia’s strict regulations with tight security.

He told the Rotarians 26 Australian companies are licensed to produce and cultivate cannabis in indoor facilities only, along with 20 manufacturing licenses. “In Tasmania at least four companies are cultivating and producing cannabis,” Mr Baxter said. “It’s harder to get a cannabis license than to manufacture opiates.

All staff are monitored; they can have no criminal record.” In 2016 Australia’s Parliament unanimously passed legislation permitting the production of cannabis for medicinal purposes, focussing on its use for childhood epilepsy, nausea in cancer and HIV patients and palliative care.

The Australian system is the most heavily regulated in the world, with both the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the Office of Drug Control in charge. Three separate licenses are needed to grow, manufacture and research the substance and gaining them is a long process.

Mr Baxter said medicinal cannabis could also be used for pain management, particularly for multiple schlerosis and neuropathic pain. “The advantages are in using it to decrease nausea, increase appetite, manage chronic pain and to manage muscle spasms,” he said. “Its possible side effects are memory loss and schizophrenia.”

Commercial production of medicinal cannabis, closely related to the hop plant, is from the flowers of high yielding bushy plants about 60cm high. It grows from seeds or cuttings, cuttings being the preferred method of Australian producers.

Over 8-10 week cycles the plants, which Mr Baxter describes as “one of the world’s easiest plants to grow”, are cultivated in 16-18 hour days at 24C. They have a final 12 hours of darkness before the unopened flower buds are harvested, dried, trimmed and cured.

Tasmanian Alkaloids extracts oil from the flowers and puts it into capsules. Currently Australian companies can export only product, not flower buds; the product can only be used for four substances within pharmaceutical products.

“For Australian companies the potential for making money is in the international market, especially in complementary health products,” Mr Baxter said. “The current Australian market is only around 2000 people - and they must be buying their supplies overseas because Australia isn’t producing enough yet.”

Mr Baxter made it clear in his address to the Rotary Club that he was speaking from his own viewpoint and not on behalf of Tasmanian Alkaloids.

Land sale plan a reprieve for Quamby Parish churches

FeatureJoanne Eisemann

January 2019 | Sharon Webb

THE PROPOSED sale of a church-owned block of land in Carrick has removed three Quamby Parish churches given to the people in perpetuity from the Anglican church and cemetery fire sale.

In December of 2018, Tasmania’s Anglican Bishop, Richard Condie, released a list of church properties to parishioners state-wide, indicating which are to be sold and which reprieved.

St Mary’s Church rectory and cemetery in Hagley, built with donations from the Dry family; St Andrew’s Church in Carrick, given by the Reibey family; and St Andrew’s Church in Westbury, built by the British Government with convict labour, now will not be sold – if the parish can raise $400,000 from the sale of vacant land on the corner of Meander Valley Rd and East St in Carrick.

In addition, Deloraine’s saleyards, church hall and cemetery, and Meander’s St Saviour’s Church appear to be saved from the chopping block.

But according to Reverend Josephine Pyecroft from Quamby Parish, a row is brewing over which real estate agent will sell the Carrick land.

“We had it valued by Harrison Humphreys; Rob Harrison is a descendent of the Reibey family who gave the church to the people. But the Anglican Hobart office wants to arrange the sale with their choice of estate agent.

“However the deeds say the land can’t be sold without the signatures of the priest and two wardens and we need to go to the Reibey family to sell it.

“We want Harrison Humphreys to sell it, then the money must come back to the parish. We will then donate the money to the Anglican’s Child Sexual Abuse National Redress fund.”

Rev Pyecroft said she was amazed at the decision to save the three churches and their cemeteries.

“I thought we might save Hagley because Sir Richard Dry, the first Tasmanian-born premier of this State, is buried beneath the altar there, but all three churches were off the list,” she said.

“In the lead-up to the decision I asked parishioners to pray every day for two minutes at 12 noon and I’m silly enough to think that had a lot to do with it.”

Quamby Parish has raised more than $50,000 to head off the churches’ sale; in addition, new State draft legislation decreeing cemeteries cannot be closed until 100 years after the last burial instead of the current 30 years has damped down Bishop Condie’s sale plan. St Mary’s Church is defined as a cemetery because Sir Richard is buried in it.

Rev. Pyecroft said she could identify with people distressed at the thought of the sale of land containing their relatives’ graves; her parents’ ashes are buried in her husband’s grave in St Mary’s cemetery.

“This has been the emotional and spiritual abuse this year,” she said.

“I haven’t heard of anyone against the sexual abuse redress scheme, but all the while this other abuse has been going on in the background. This is not the Anglican Church I know.”

Rev. Pyecroft was also able to shed light on the rationale for Bishop Condie’s churches and cemetery sale plan.

“The Bishop told us he had to raise $8m for the redress scheme and he proposed to sell 106 properties,” she said.

“Twenty-five per cent of the money raised was to go to the redress scheme and the rest to be used to start a new Tasmanian ministry, where congregations would meet in school halls and people’s houses.

“The former Sydney Archbishop Peter Jensen and his brother, Dean Phillip Jensen totally changed the face of the diocese to create an almost nonliturgical church run on Calvinist lines. And Bishop Condie has announced that he’s a Calvinist.”

Rev. Pyecroft, who has not been paid by the Anglican Church for the past 18 years, said clergy were not told what the new Tasmanian ministry would be like, just that the Quamby Parish would need to raise $216,000 for the redress scheme and $200,000 to indicate they could pay the salary of a new priest.

“More than $400,000 is an impossible task so we put in a submission to the Anglican Church Diocesan Council proposing to sell the Carrick land,” she said.

Two thirds of the Anglican properties listed for sale have not been rescued, including the Church of the Good Shepherd in Hadspen, the Fencing Paddock in Carrick, and vacant land in Elizabeth Town.

Photo | Mike Moores

St Andrews Church, in Westbury is one of four Meander Valley churches to escape closure and sale.

St Andrews Church, in Westbury is one of four Meander Valley churches to escape closure and sale.

Cars and coffins

News, EventsJoanne Eisemann
Piercer Paul and skeleton bride

Piercer Paul and skeleton bride

November 2018 | Haley Manning

A SOLID crowd of car enthusiasts and over 300 unique vehicles spread over the Village Green in October, for the Rotary Club of Westbury Car Show. President of Rotary and organiser of the event, David Lee, said he initiated the fund raiser, now in its fourth year, to replace their long-held annual Fun Run.

“We encourage anything on wheels – old or new, they are all special; we even had a pedal car at this one,” he said. Paul ‘Piercer Paul’ Anderson said car shows on the mainland tend to favour specific models, whereas the Westbury one offers something different to look at, with varied models and vintages.

“You can satisfy 97 per cent of the people when you hold a car show like this,” he said. Paul has owned his 1973 HQ Holden utility for five years, but said it was silver with orange GTS stripes and a tradesman tray before it was painted black, modified and the tray extended to nine-foot long to display a skeleton bride seated in an open coffin.

The tattooist of 35 years says the theme goes with his character. “Since I was young I have always thought outside the box.” The $4,500 donated this year will be distributed by the Rotary Drought Relief Fund to drought-stressed farmers.

Photo | Hayley Manning

Welcome to Green Door gastronomy

BusinessJoanne Eisemann
Nick and Hayley Brazendale have recently opened the ‘Green Door’ café restaurant and apothecary in Westbury.

Nick and Hayley Brazendale have recently opened the ‘Green Door’ café restaurant and apothecary in Westbury.

November 2018 | David Claridge

A NEW Westbury business has taken off, wowing locals and visitors alike with an Irish theme, offering a new diversified level of café and restaurant experience. Aptly named the Green Door, the café, restaurant and apothecary has impressed with their desire to use local stock and make products in-house. Café owners, Nick and Hayley Brazendale, have been amazed by the positive feedback they’ve received since they opened just over a month ago.

At the Green Door we make everything in-house and use local, spray free, organic produce

“We bought the building about six months ago. After doing a lot of research about Westbury we found that it has a long Irish history, most people in the 18th and even 19th century were even talking in gaelic.” Hayley said.

“Our restaurant was built by an Irish couple in the 1840’s, we wanted to make our business relevant and about Westbury. “At the Green Door we make everything in-house and use local, spray free, organic produce. “My mother, Julie, is a Patisserie Chef, she makes all the cakes and desserts. Eventually they want to grow their own produce for the kitchen and have applied for a liquor licence.

Local music artists have been coming in to perform and weddings and parties are already filling their diary. They also host cookery classes, artisan perfume making, art classes and, on the 4th December, a Christmas wreath making class. The Green Door has an active Facebook page which already has 600 likes as well as many five-star ratings and wonderful reviews.

Photo | Mike Moores

Living comfortably

EventsJoanne Eisemann
Sustainable house at Westbury.

Sustainable house at Westbury.

SEPTEMBER 2018

SOME FANTASTIC, sustainable homes in the North of Tasmania will be open to the public on Sustainable House Day on Sunday, 16th September. These include two in Westbury and one in Sheffield, Devonport, and Greens Beach. All very diff„erent, some are new builds while others are sustainable renovations.

Homes will be open to the public from 10.00am to 4.00pm.

Profiles of all houses listed with their sustainable credentials are listed on: sustainablehouseday. com/ find-a-sustainable-house.

Established in 2001, Sustainable House Day is a national event that allows the public to see and learn from the best environmental homes in Australia. It aims to inspire people to live sustainably, showing them how to lower energy bills, live comfortably and help the environment through good home design, practices and technology.

Sean and Amanda Manners from Westbury, will join more than 200 homeowners nationwide in opening their home to the community to pass on tips and advice, including on solar power, home batteries, o„- grid living, innovative building materials and design, and more.

Sustainable House Day is a valuable resource for anyone looking for practical information on sustainable homes: what works, what doesn’t and how to move towards ‘greener’ living.

All visitors to Sustainable House Day must register to attend via the website www. sustainablehouseday.com to obtain addresses of all open houses.

Photo | Sean Manners

Westbury, Meander Valley’s power cut capital

NewsJoanne EisemannComment
Albert-DeVeth-is-getting-used-to-reading-by-candlelight-during-the-many-power-outages-being-experienced-in-Westbury.jpg

AUGUST 2018 | David Claridge

A HIGH number of recent power outages in the Westbury area have prompted locals to speak up in the hope of finding out what is going on.

Information supplied from Tas Networks can confirm that from 2017 to 2018 there have been 33 outages, with only 16 of them planned. The outages have varied in length from three minutes to nine hours.

Talking with a spokesman from Tas Networks, this reporter has learned that the bulk of the Westbury area is supplied by a feeder from the Hadspen substation. The same feeder also supplies Whitemore and Glenore.

Tas Networks are aware of the issue, claiming that ‘The Westbury community does not currently meet their reliability standards’.

“TasNetworks recognises Westbury urban community as one of the poor performing communities and has plans to reduce the length, and hence exposure, of the feeders supplying it” the spokesman said.

“A project has been proposed to rationalise the supply to Westbury urban area, enabling the feeder a cleaner, more direct route to Westbury.

“The project will involve extending our network 5 km along the Bass Highway between Hagley Station Lane and Veterans Row at an estimated cost of $1.7 million and it is planned to be operational by June 2023.”

“Interim solutions, such as investigating if we can eliminate or minimise outages through better protection and transfer capability are currently being investigated to improve the reliability performance of the community prior to the execution of the long term solution.”

It has been shared that one Westbury resident has been refunded $80.00 by Tas Networks for an outage that lasted longer than nine hours.

Photo | Mike Moores

Recital Rustica Romania

Arts and ReviewsJoanne EisemannComment
Rustica-cropped.jpg

AUGUST 2018 | Sharon Webb

A FEAST of classical and European folk music performed by local musicians will be presented by Arts Deloraine at Gallery 9 on Sunday 26th August.

The star attraction will be Deloraine composer Bruce McNicol playing the premiere of his recently completed Left Hand Piano Sonata along with two more of his compositions, Two Nocturnes and a Waltz Macabre and Ten Conversations with my Mother (Elegy).

Mr McNicol said his compositions for piano will be the first of three of the concert performances featuring very different types of music.

“Concert goers will also be treated to a duet: Westbury’s Joanne Mitchelson on harp and Hamish Pike on violin,” he said.

“They will play several pieces from their extensive repertoire, including an original work by each, Plaisir d’amour by G. Martini, Heartstrings by Rolf Lovland and Butterfly, a traditional Irish tune.”

Finally, as a trio, the musicians will present the first performance of their new world music group Rustica Romania, with Bruce on piano accordion, Joanne on Romanian Pan flute and Hamish on violin.

“As the Romanians themselves do, this will be a mixture of folk music and such pieces as The Lonely Shepherd, written by James Last in 1978 for pan flute and Hungarian Dance No. 5 by Johannes Brahms,” Mr NcNicol said.

The concert begins at 2.00pm; tickets are $20.00, $15.00 concession and Arts Deloraine members, and $10.00 for youth up to 16 years, available at the door or from the Alpaca Shoppe.

Photo | Wayne Enright

You can bank on Simon

Events, NewsJoanne EisemannComment
Simon-Deloraine-and-Districts-Community-bank-manager.jpg

JULY 2018 | Cody Handley

NEW BRANCH manager for Deloraine and Districts Community Bank, Simon Rootes, has worked for Bendigo Bank since he was eighteen years old, starting out as a teller.

Simon grew up in Westbury, where he attended Hagley Farm Primary, with his mother teaching at Deloraine High School.

Simon spent a lot of his younger years at his grandparents’ farm at Whitemore which ran beef and dairy cattle. “It’s good to have something you can relate to people with. Many of our local customers here are farmers,” he said.

“I enjoy lending money to help people achieve their dreams or assisting people to get their finances in order at a young age. I also hold a financial planning diploma, so assisting people restructure their finances to get better results is a passion of mine.”

The Deloraine and Districts Community Bank have operated for thirteen years, with Simon’s predecessor Darren Rumble at the helm for ten of those years. Simon started working for the Community Bank in May 2016 in a relief position before being offered a permanent role.

“Coming back to Deloraine gave me a new lease on life,” he said. “Our bank is community owned so that means that fifty percent of profits go back into the community. Bendigo is the only bank in Australia that runs the community model. It’s great to see that community branches like ours have taken over the corporate model in recent years.”

“We are our own entity that is in partnership with Bendigo. The aim for us is about getting our name recognised as ‘a different place’ whose main focus is to benefit our local community members.”

The Community Bank has been involved in many great projects, such as funding the pool heating and therapy spa for Giant Steps, a commitment of $250,000 over five years for the Deloraine and District Recreation Precinct, and a $4,000 grant for Grenoch Home to purchase ipods so residents could enjoy music from their younger days. The Community Bank also sponsored this year’s Junior Beef Expo, supporting the next generation of cattle farmers.

Since opening in Deloraine, the Community Bank has seen $1.3 million go back into the Meander Valley area. Simon said he would like to see that number total $3 million by 2021.

In fact, Simon said the Community Bank are looking to further reinvest in the community and are offering a second grant round this year for community projects in late July/early August. Simon invites anyone who knows of a worthwhile project to call into the Branch to find out more.

For leisure, Simon enjoys fishing and has just purchased a forty acre property with his wife, where they are going to run cattle and horses like his grandparents did.

Photo | Mike Moores